Biodiversity: A Digital Journey

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#glfbiodiversity

Are you ready to join us on a four-week Biodiversity Online Learning Journey about biodiversity and climate action, as we gear up for the GLF Biodiversity Digital Conference?  

The Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL), together with the Global Landscapes Forum (GLF)the Wageningen Centre for Development and Innovation (WCDI), and in collaboration with Youth 4 Nature, is shaping a unique learning experience for students and young professionals interested in becoming leaders in biodiversity and climate action

Find Concept Note here

The Program

The Program

The two-day GLF Biodiversity Digital Conference will gather students and young professionals from all over the world. Playing key roles as speakers, volunteers, moderators and MCs,  youth will not only participate in the conference but will contribute to shaping the outcomes that emerge. 

The two-day conference will be, for some, the last stop of a digital journey – and for others, the first destination: participants in the online course “Biodiversity: a Digital Journey” will use the knowledge and skills earned during the program to contribute to the conference conversations, while delegations from more than 15 youth organizations will embark on a new path with us – co-creating a biodiversity policy brief. 

Conference attendees will also be able to start or finish their days with regionally focused Youth Daily Shows, which will explore biodiversity-related topics through the eyes of young speakers.

SOME OF YOUTH FORUM'S SPEAKERS

YOUTH AGENDA

Bonn: UTC/GMT +1

Biodiversity: A Digital Journey

07:30-08:00
Young Professionals for Agricultural Development (YPARD) with Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

Agriculture is the main income source for most rural households in Asia and the Pacific region. However, the increasing biodiversity loss due to climate change represents a huge threat to people’s livelihoods, the consequences of which could be even more dangerous than the COVID-19 pandemic. To promote youth engagement in biodiversity protection toward achieving the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, this Youth Daily Show – led by Young Professionals for Agricultural Development (YPARD) in collaboration with the Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) – will explore what young Indigenous people working in agriculture are doing to preserve biodiversity

08:00-08:45

Join us for an informal facilitated networking session. Guided by conversational menus you will have the opportunity to connect with fellow conference participants in short breakout sessions of 10 minutes each. These sessions are limited to 1,000 participants, on a first come, first served basis.

GLF Biodiversity – Networking Menu Session 2

Visit the digital exhibition booths, brought to you by leading environmental and grassroots organizations. Connect and learn with 25 booths, open 24/7. In Whova, under Exhibitions.

09:00-10:30
CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA) with FAO

Biodiversity is already a well-recognized element of sustainable forest management (SFM). The role of forests in maintaining biodiversity is also explicitly recognized by the UN Strategic Plan for Forests 2017-2030. The purpose of this session is to discuss the state of mainstreaming biodiversity in the forest sector, take stock of existing concepts and tools for integrating biodiversity in forest management and make recommendations for future actions. The results of the discussion will inform the research of FTA as well as preparatory work  towards the implementation of FAO’s Strategy on Biodiversity Mainstreaming across Agricultural Sectors.

The International Livestock Research Institute

The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the power zoonoses have to disrupt our economies, public health and food systems. In response to this, One Health has grown as an approach for addressing the current inadequacies in responses to such global health crises, as well as playing an important role in addressing and mitigating climate change and biodiversity loss. This panel will highlight why those promoting a landscape approach should pay greater attention to landscape health and its relationship with animal (livestock and wildlife) and human health, as part of an integrated One Health approach. If landscape policies and investments continue to be made without taking into account a One Health lens, they will miss opportunities to contribute to addressing the biggest challenges of our time.

  • Doreen Robinson

    Chief for Wildlife, UN Environment Programme

  • Fiona Flintan

    Governance Scientist and Technical Coordinator, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

  • Bernard Bett

    Senior Scientist, Animal and Human Health , International Livestock Research Institute

  • Enkh-Amgalan Tseelei

    National Coordinator, Rangeland Ecosystem Management Project "Green Gold" of the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation in Mongolia

  • Dennis Carroll

    Chair of the Leadership Board, Global Virome Project

  • Fernanda Thomas da Rocha

    Senior Regional Technical Specialist, Rural Institutions for the Latin America and the Caribbean region, IFAD

  • Martina Fleckenstein

    Global Policy Manager, Food Practice, WWF

  • Phuc Pham-Duc

    Vice Deputy Director of the Center for Public Health and Ecosystem Research (CENPHER) Coordinator of the Vietnam One Health University Network (VOHUN)

  • John Colmey

    Managing Director, GLF

German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE)

The zoonotic origins of COVID 19 and countries’ reactions to the pandemic raise important questions about the future of protected areas. First, does the threat of virus spillover events after all call for a stricter separation of nature and people despite all justified criticism of fortress conservation approaches? Second, how can conservation funding cope with dumps in international wildlife tourism? We will discuss these questions in the format of a digital roundtable with experts in protected areas from different backgrounds. We will include practical examples of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on protected areas and aim to provide policy-oriented conclusions that could feed into the protected areas work at the upcoming IUCN World Conservation Congress and CBD COP 15.

Find this session’s white paper here.

  • Anna Spenceley

    Board Member, Global Sustainable Tourism Council

  • Adrian Martin

    Professor, School of International Development, University of East Anglia

  • Herbert Lust

    Senior Vice President of Global Public Partnerships and Senior Vice President and Managing Director, Conservation International Europe

  • Maricela Fernández

    Indigenous Cabécar leader

10:45-12:15
Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) with The Tenure Facility, Forest Peoples Programme

The environment, climate change, biodiversity, health, the economy – we face multiple crises. Deforestation and ecosystem degradation have not lost their momentum – we are losing biodiversity fast, reducing our ability to use land-based solutions. Mono-causal solutions have not worked for these interconnected problems. This interactive and informative session will invite the audience to learn and explore, with experts from science and indigenous peoples, how to deliver a green, just recovery: How are biodiversity and climate change linked? How can rights-based approaches protect and fully restore ecological functionality? Which policy processes and finances are needed? Where are the priorities?

  • Kate Dooley

    Research Fellow, University of Melbourne

  • Christopher Martius

    Director, CIFOR Germany

  • Nonette Royo

    Executive Director, The Tenure Facility

  • Stephen Leonard

    Senior Policy Analyst , Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)

  • Virginia Young

    Member of the World Commission on Protected Areas and the IUCN Task force on Primary forests and Intact forest landscapes

  • Tonio Sadik

    Director of Environment, Assembly, First Nations (Canada)

Patagonia

Artifishal is a film about people, rivers, and the fight for the future of wild fish and the environment that supports them. It explores wild salmon’s slide toward extinction, threats posed by fish hatcheries and fish farms, and our continued loss of faith in nature.

12:30-13:00
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

The 252nd edition of international forestry journal Unasylva, “Restoring the Earth: the next decade”, is devoted to building momentum for the restoration agenda to 2030, particularly in light of the opportunities presented by major restoration commitments such as the Bonn Challenge, the New York Declaration on Forests, AFR100, Initiative 20×20 and the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration 2021-2030.

  • Christophe Besacier

    Senior Forestry Officer, Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism Forestry Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Faustine Zoveda

    Forestry Officer, Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism Forestry Division , Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Valentina Garavaglia

    International consultant, Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism, Forestry Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Katie Reytar

    Senior Research Associate , World Resources Institute (WRI)

  • Musonda Mumba

    Chief, Terrestrial Ecosystems Unit (TEU), UN Environment

  • Tom Lalampaa

    Chief Executive Officer , Northern Rangelands Trust, Kenya

  • Julien Noël Rakotoarisoa

    Director General of Environmental Governance, Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development, Madagascar

  • Adriana Vidal

    Senior Forest Policy Officer, IUCN

Global Youth Biodiversity Network with Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

Years from now, historians will be discussing the reality we are living and the tomorrow we are defining. What will they call this age? The age of climate denial, the age of biodiversity loss or could it possible be the age of collective action? In a critical moment for the planet and all its peoples, the IPBES 2019 Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, suggest that we all get on the train of Transformative Change – a profound, fundamental, system-wide and strategic change in discourses, actions, values and policy. 

13:15-14:00
Global Landscapes Forum

The variety of life on Earth is being lost at an unprecedented rate. Now more than ever, the health of our planet requires us to recognize our complex, interdependent relationships with nature. During this opening plenary, keynote speakers will interact with the online community to frame the wicked problems of biodiversity loss alongside land degradation, climate change and the emergence of zoonotic pandemics. We kick off the conference with a call for a One Health approach, spotlighting the essential role of biodiversity and setting the scene for building back better.

  • Ashok Sridharan

    Mayor of Bonn, President of ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability

  • Jay Griffiths

    Award winning author, Advocate of nature

  • Elizabeth Mrema

    Executive Secretary , UN Convention on Biological Diversity

  • Shahid Naeem

    E3B Professor, Chair of the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology, Colombia University

  • Laura H. Kahn

    Physician and Research Scholar, Program on Science and Global Security at the Princeton University School of Public and International Affairs

  • Yolanda Kakabadse Navarro

    Former Minister of Environment for Ecuador

14:00-14:45
UN Environment Programme (UNEP)

This participatory plenary will be framed around the post-2020 global biodiversity framework, the Paris climate goals and the UN Decade of Ecosystem Restoration, all of which call on the global community to ‘bend the curve’ on these critical issues. Key global policy makers, scientists as well as business and community leaders will inform the audience about plans in place for the new decade, and engage in critical discussion. Through constructive debate, we will explore how the new policy frameworks can spark a vivid societal dialogue, consolidate next steps and pave the way for direct global action from individuals, civil society, local authorities and the global business community.

  • Musonda Mumba

    Chief, Terrestrial Ecosystems Unit (TEU), UN Environment

  • Sir Robert Watson

    Head of the scientific advisory group for the UNEP Global Assessments Synthesis Report

  • H.E. Fekadu Beyene Aleka

    Commissioner, Environment, Forest and Climate Change Commission of Ethiopia

  • Niria Alicia Garcia

    Indigenous leader and innovator, UN Young Champion of the Earth finalist

  • Johan Rockström

    Director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research , Professor in Earth System Science at the University of Potsdam

14:45-14:50
Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) with World Agroforestry (ICRAF)

Join leaders of the Asian Forest Cooperation Organization (AFoCO), World Agroforestry and Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR-ICRAF), Global EverGreening Alliance (Alliance) for the signing of a landmark partnership agreement to restore drylands and drought-prone areas in Asia.

  • Robert Nasi

    Director General, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Managing Director, CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Tony Simons

    Director General, World Agroforestry (ICRAF) , Executive Director, CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Chris Armitage

    CEO, Global EverGreening Alliance

  • Chencho Norbu

    Executive Director, Asian Forest Cooperation Organization (AFoCO)

15:00-15:45
The United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration (UN Decade)

Aware of the critical state of degradation of ecosystems worldwide, on 1 March 2019, under Resolution 73/284, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 2021 – 2030 to be the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration. The resolution calls for supporting and scaling up efforts to prevent, halt and reverse the degradation of ecosystems worldwide, as well as to raise awareness of the importance of ecosystem restoration. UNEP and FAO are the lead implementing UN agencies of the Decade and therefore, to support its implementation, a Task Force on Best Practices (TF) has been established involving a group of 85 individuals from 32 global leading organizations in the field of knowledge capitalization and dissemination. Led by FAO, this group is in charge of setting the ground for future efforts on knowledge capitalization and dissemination as well as the identification of new knowledge products, proposing an action plan for scientific research over the course of the Decade.

  • Christophe Besacier

    Senior Forestry Officer, Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism Forestry Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Faustine Zoveda

    Forestry Officer, Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism Forestry Division , Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Vera Boerger

    Senior Land and Water Officer, Land and Water Division (NSL) , FAO

  • Kathleen Buckingham

    Senior Manager, Social Research, Data and Innovation, Global Restoration Initiative, World Resources Institute

  • Robin Chazdon

    Research and Consultant, Forestoration International

Global Biodiversity Outlook (GBO) with UN CBD

Global Biodiversity Outlook (GBO) is the flagship publication of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). GBO-5 provides global summary of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets and sets the scene for the development of the post 2020-global biodiversity framework. It is based on a range of indicators, research studies and assessments (in particular the IPBES Global Assessment on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services), as well as the national reports provided by countries on their implementation of the CBD. This Outlook draws on the lessons learned during the first two decades of this century to identify the transitions needed if we are to realize the vision agreed by world governments for 2050, ‘Living in Harmony with Nature’.

  • David Cooper

    Deputy Executive Secretary, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) , Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)

The Amazon Conservation Team

Once, conservation organizations and multilateral institutions regarded many remote indigenous and rural cultures as groups requiring relocation or “development” according to Western parameters. The 21st century has seen a burgeoning awareness that neither alternative is desirable. Nonetheless, there exists a relative dearth of examples of how best to partner with these increasingly imperiled communities to help protect their forests and their cultures as modernity presses in on all sides. This session focuses on successful efforts in northern Amazonia to help forest communities seize control of their destinies while developing a broader governance vision for indigenous stewardship that emphasizes nonlinear economies.

16:00-17:30
Sustainable Wildlife Management with Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD), OACPS, Funded by the European Union

The session will launch the White Paper and Policy Brief “Build Back Better in a post-COVID world – Reducing future wildlife-borne spillover of disease to humans” produced by the Sustainable Wildlife Management Programme. Presenters will discuss alternative strategies to tackle the drivers of zoonotic disease emergence and their spread along wildlife value chains. They will emphasize the need to consider and involve the millions of citizens, communities and Indigenous People who rely on wildlife for food, income and cultural identity. Discussions will focus on how to encourage policy dialogue and coordinated targeted investments to prevent, detect and respond to future pandemics.

  • Philippe Mayaux, Head of sector Biodiversity and ecosystem services – Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development (DG DEVCO) – European Commission 
  • Michelle Edgardine Ngwapaza, Deputy General Director and National focal point for the SWM Programme in Gabon – Wildlife and Protected Areas General Directorate (DGFAP), Ministry of waters, forests, sea and environment, in charge of Climate Plan and Land Use Plan – Republic of Gabon (Central Africa) 
  • Nickolas Fredericks, Current Toshao (indigenous village chief) for Shulinab village. Current chairman of the National Toshaos Council, the highest representative body for Indigenous Peoples in Guyana 
  • Nathalie van Vliet, Associate researcher – Site Coordinator SWM Programme Guyana – CIFOR 
  • Amanda Fine, Associate Director, Wildlife Health Programme WCS 
  • Marisa Peyre, Deputy Head ASTRE research unit – CIRAD 
  • Keith Sumption, Chief Veterinary Officer and Leader of the Animal Health Programme at FAO Director of the Joint Centre for Zoonoses and Anti-Microbial Resistance (CJWZ) 

Find this session’s white paper here.

  • Maria Helena Semedo

    Deputy Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Philippe Mayaux

    Head of sector Biodiversity and ecosystem services - Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development (DG DEVCO), European Commission

  • Michelle Edgardine Ngwapaza

    Deputy General Director & National focal point for the SWM Programme in Gabon - Wildlife and Protected Areas General Directorate (DGFAP), Ministry of waters, forests, sea and environment, in charge of Climate Plan and Land Use Plan – Republic of Gabon (Central Africa)

  • Nickolas Fredericks

    Current Toshao (indigenous village chief) for Shulinab village. Current chairman of the National Toshaos Council, the highest representative body for Indigenous Peoples in Guyana , Current chairman for the South Rupununi District Council (a representative body for the 21 Southern Rupununi indigenous communities)

  • Amanda Fine

    Associate Director, Wildlife Health Programme WCS

  • Marisa Peyre

    Deputy Head, ASTRE research unit, CIRAD

  • Keith Sumption

    Chief Veterinary Officer and Leader of the Animal Health Programme at FAO , Director of the Joint Centre for Zoonoses and Anti-Microbial Resistance (CJWZ)

  • Cristelle Pratt

    Assistant Secretary-General, Department of Environment and Climate Action, Organisation of African, Caribbean and Pacific States

Global Crop Diversity Trust

Our global food systems depend on agrobiodiversity – that is, the vast diversity of crops, trees and livestock that underpins our entire agricultural system, make it less vulnerable to pests and diseases, and contribute to landscape restoration and resilience in the midst of the climate crisis. Through Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Target 2.5, we have pledged to ensure the conservation and sustainable use of all our agrobiodiversity by 2020. However, even though we have made significant strides towards hitting the target, we are still far from implementation.

  • Charlotte Lusty

    Head of Programmes, Global Crop Diversity Trust

  • Desterio Nyamongo

    Senior Principal Research Officer and Director, Genetic Resources Research Institute Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization

  • Lavernee Gueco

    Researcher - College of Agriculture and Food Science , University of Los Banos - The Philippines

  • Vania Azevedo

    Head, Genebank, ICRISAT

  • Nelissa Jamora

    Agricultural Economist

  • Maarten van Zonneveld

    Genebank Manager, World Vegetable Center

  • Filippo Bassi

    Senior Scientist, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas

  • Alejandro Argumedo

    Program Director, Asociación ANDES

  • Shivali Sharma

    Theme Leader, Pre-breeding; and Senior Scientist – Genetic Resources at ICRISAT-Hyderabad

  • Maria Andrade

    Scientist and World Food Prize Laureate, International Potato Center

Global Peatlands Initiative with UN Environment Programme (UNEP), Greifswald Mire Centre, Tompkins Conservation

This session will take you on a two-part peatlands journey to some of the most rare, remote and unique places in the world. Many peatlands offer a safe haven for rare and threatened biodiversity – from the orangutan of Indonesia to the golden sphagnum moss of Northern Ireland. Transport yourself to the remote forested swamps of the Congo Basin and then onward to the tip of the South American continent. Peatlands also offer vital stopping-off points for migratory species – connecting species to special places across the globe. Peatlands can also be carbon-packed micro-rainforests that house bizarre creatures and tales of the past. UNEP invites you to discover why peatlands are a critical habitat for biodiversity and what they offer to our climate and our health. This world tour will provide examples and share experiences and strategies, while highlighting the important role that partnerships can play in safeguarding biodiversity.
Find this session’s white paper here.

17:45-19:15
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) on behalf of the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) as part of the International Climate Initiative (IKI) with World Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Global Nature Fund

To implement the Post-2020 Biodiversity Framework, a major challenge will be to customize and redesign financial instruments to ensure that investment plans are evaluated for their potential risk to nature, or to create incentives for biodiversity-friendly investment into value chains. The session will bring together expert practitioners from the public and private sectors in multiple continents to discuss existing approaches in the field of financial instruments, good practices and lessons learned, as well as how to bring successful approaches to scale and how to link COVID-19 response measures to financing for a biodiversity-friendly future.
Find this session’s white paper here.

  • Monique Akullo

    Senior Internal Monitoring and Evaluation Officer, National Environment Management Authority (NEMA)

  • Gabriel Quijandría Acosta

    Vice Minister for Strategic Development and Natural Resources, Ministry of the Environment, Peru

  • Vinod Mathur

    Chairman, National Biodiversity Authority

  • Maureen Erasmus

    Advisor and Non-Executive Director

  • Rodrigo de la Cruz

    Technical Advisor to the Indigenous Forum , Abya Yala (FIAY) and International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity (IIFB)

  • Hugo Verkuijl

    Program Development Manager Sustainable Food , Hivos

  • Humberto Delgado Rosa

    Director for Natural Capital, European Commission, Directorate General for the Environment

  • Sascha Müller-Kraenner

    Executive Director, Environmental Action Germany (DUH)

WWF

The triple challenge is the imperative to simultaneously deliver a stable climate, recovering biodiversity and healthy food for 10 billion people by 2050. Building on discussions at the GLF Bonn in June, this event advances thinking on the concept further, and explores the implications through a deep dive into the case of the Greater Virunga Landscape. In the Virunga landscape this triple challenge looms large, as does the risk of disease transmission between both wildlife and humans, making the One Health approach essential. The discussion will combine speakers from the landscape with external experts and the audience to explore how to negotiate and balance these challenges.

World Bank

The COVID pandemic has brought new attention to the importance of landscape health for human health in addition to economic resilience. The transfer of zoonotic diseases from animals to humans makes clear the interdependence of human and animal health on terrestrial ecosystems, and the risks of ecosystem degradation due to human activity. Healthy landscapes are also critical for healthy economies, providing essential ecosystem services such as water, fertile soil, and erosion prevention. In many places, nature and wildlife provide the basis for nature-based tourism (NBT) that provides important income for protected area management and for jobs for local communities.

This session will look at pathways for spillover of zoonotic diseases such as COVID-19 from animals to humans, what actions can manage or stop spill over and how a One Health approach that looks at human, animal and environmental health together can make a difference. The session will also explore tools that can help bring back NBT as the world recovers from COVID-19, how restoration is important to human health, and how approaches to landscape management are evolving to encompass health considerations.

  • Raina Plowright

    Associate Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Montana State University (MSU)

  • Brooklin Hunt

    Student majoring in Pre-Veterinary Microbiology and Animal Systems Biotechnology at Montana State University (MSU)

  • Daniel Mira-Salama

    Senior Environmental Specialist, World Bank

  • Urvashi Narain

    Lead Economist, Environment, Natural Resources and Blue Economy, World Bank

19:30-20:15
Global Landscapes Forum

Agricultural supply chains are the leading driver of deforestation globally, contributing to the depletion of biodiversity and natural ecosystems. In this plenary, the audience will get an inside look at the interrelation between finance for biodiversity and sustainable land use and healthy landscapes and sustainable, inclusive value chains. A discussion among experts will place local communities at the heart of the discussion while exploring the innovative financial instruments that are needed to spark a bioeconomy, grounded in the rights and expertise of local communities.

20:15-21:00
Crop Trust

The session will envisage what the next steps should be for SDG 2.5 in the post-2020 Agenda. Where do we go from here? It will seek to demonstrate why agrobiodiversity is essential to ensure food and nutrition security for current and future global populations. The greater the diversity, the more resilient the system. Protecting crops and livestock from pests and disease, and ensuring they have improved resistance to increasing climatic shocks is essential. But how do we get there?

  • Danielle Nierenberg

    President and Co-Founder, Food Tank

  • Sir Peter Crane

    Board Chair and President, Oak Spring Garden Foundation

  • Marie Haga

    Associate Vice President for External Relations and Governance, IFAD

  • Kent Nnadozie

    Secretary, ITPGRFA (FAO)

  • Susan Bragdon

    Policy Advisor at Oxfam Novib, Sowing Diversity=Harvesting Sustainability Programme

  • Mildred Crawford

    Caribbean Network of Rural Women Producers, Farmers Co-Chair of the Executive Committee of the Global Assembly of Partners towards Habitat III (GAP)

  • Tina Claffey

    Award winning nature photographer

  • Pablo Vargas

    CEO , Britt

21:00-21:45

In Latin America, multiple drivers are putting pressure on biodiversity and natural ecosystems. This plenary will build on the issues raised in the ‘Financing Diversity’ plenary to shed light on opportunities and challenges to sustainable climate finance in the Amazon basin and the Latin American region at large. The debate will speak to financial innovations at the intersection of biodiversity and climate action and explore the initiatives and instruments needed to achieve a bio-economy that is truly based on nature’s richness, is gender–inclusive, and is grounded in the rights and expertise of Indigenous Peoples.

The two-part discussion will primarily be held in Portuguese and Spanish, with English translation.

  • Marina Campos

    Founder and Executive Director, Conexsus - US

  • Marianella Feoli

    Executive Director, Fundecooperacion for Sustainable Development

  • Elcio Machinery

    Coordinator, Coordination of the Indigenous Organizations of the Brazilian Amazon (COIAB)

In Latin America, multiple drivers are putting pressure on biodiversity and natural ecosystems. This plenary will build on the issues raised in the ‘Financing Diversity’ plenary to shed light on opportunities and challenges to sustainable climate finance in the Amazon basin and the Latin American region at large. The debate will speak to financial innovations at the intersection of biodiversity and climate action and explore the initiatives and instruments needed to achieve a bio-economy that is truly based on nature’s richness, is gender–inclusive, and is grounded in the rights and expertise of Indigenous Peoples.

The two-part discussion will primarily be held in Portuguese and Spanish, with English translation.

Bonn: UTC/GMT +1

Biodiversity: A Digital Journey

07:30-08:15
Sessions
Facilitated networking LIVE NOW

Join us for an informal facilitated networking session. Guided by conversational menus you will have the opportunity to connect with fellow conference participants in short breakout sessions of 10 minutes each. These sessions are limited to 1,000 participants, on a first come, first served basis.

GLF Biodiversity – Networking Menu Session 3

Visit the digital exhibition booths, brought to you by leading environmental and grassroots organizations. Connect and learn with 25 booths, open 24/7. In Whova, under Exhibitions.

08:30-10:00
World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies (WOCAT) with International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Global Environment Facility (GEF), WWF, UN Environment Programme (UNEP), The International Livestock Research Institute, Somos Territorio ABC, Wajari, Department of Wildlife Protection Leh

Rangelands (grassland, savannahs and silvo-pastoral systems) in dry areas and mountains account for the largest global restoration opportunities for ecosystems, human and environmental health, and economic growth.

  • Hanspeter Liniger

    Director, WOCAT

  • Chris Magero

    Rangeland management expert , International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

  • Fiona Flintan

    Governance Scientist and Technical Coordinator, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

  • Paola Agostini

    Lead Natural Resources Management Specialist, Europe and Central Asia, World Bank

  • Boshra Salem

    Professor, University of Alexandria, Egypt

  • Azamat Isakov

    Project Coordinator , Public Foundation CAMP Ala-Too

  • Jonathan Davies

    Senior Agriculture Advisor, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

  • Rima Mekdaschi Studer

    Senior Research Scientist at the Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), WOCAT (World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies )

  • Alissa Wachter

    Leader of the Resource Mobilisation and Program Development for WWF's global Food Practice, WWF

  • John Kamanga

    South Rift Association of Land Owners (SOLARO), Kenya

Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)

Integrated landscape approaches feature prominently in recent UN conventions as promoted strategies to address inter-connected social, political, economic and environmental challenges in tropical frontier landscapes. However, evidence of their effectiveness remains poorly researched, reported and understood. This session will address this gap through a book launch that showcases COLANDS initiatives that are implementing integrated landscape approaches in Ghana, Zambia, and Indonesia. Speakers will share their experiences of conceptualizing, designing and implementing landscape approaches, including: why biodiversity needs to be integrated within landscape approaches, how better governance can be achieved, what evaluation approaches are appropriate and how to bridge sectorial, disciplinary and knowledge system divides.

Find the book here
Find this session’s white paper here.

09:15-10:00

Journey to Malaysian Borneo with The Borneo Project to learn about the rare wildlife of this unique island and see how local communities are involved in documenting and maintaining forest health! Join Fi, Bryan, Shahnaz, and Jettie on an exploration of the rainforests of the Baram River Basin to learn about a community-led project to document the endemic species of this ecosystem. This extraordinary, remote land is home to the Orang Ulu, which roughly means “people of the interior”, a term that includes many different indigenous groups. Together we will discuss how community-led forest protection is an essential tool in maintaining biodiversity, and we will even see some of the rare species that have evolved to suit this particular climate. It’s everything you could want from an exotic eco-tour, minus the mosquitos and humidity!

  • Shahnaz Sahmat

    Researcher, Institute of Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation, Universiti Malaysia Sarawak

  • Fiona McAlpine

    Communications and Project Manager, The Borneo Project

  • Bryan Anderson

    Field Manager, SAVE Rivers Network

  • Jettie Word

    Executive Director, The Borneo Project

10:15-11:45
ICIMOD

The Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region extends across eight countries from Afghanistan in the west to Myanmar in the east, crossing Pakistan, India, China, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. It is a globally important resource – biologically and culturally rich, it provides ecosystem goods and services to a quarter of the world’s population. The HKH is the Pulse of the Planet – what happens here affects the rest of the world. This session will explain why the HKH is the Pulse of the Planet and the need to reinforce positive relations between biodiversity, landscapes, culture and health in a post-COVID ‘new normal’.

Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) with Satoyama Initiative, LandScale, UNU-IAS, HoARECN – African Landscape Dialogue

The new CBD Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework (GBF) will build on a theory of change aiming for transformative shifts and involving the whole of society. Landscape-based initiatives and approaches across the globe have evidenced the potential contribution of non-state actors in achieving global goals. Landscape governance arrangements are complementary to existing CBD approaches, and align with the GBF objectives. This session will highlight and discuss the role of landscape approaches and arrangements undertaken by non-state actors to support the GBF, discuss how policies could support this and illustrate the potential for area-based non-state actor GBF commitments and verification.

Knowledge products:

  • Marcel Kok

    Programme leader, International Biodiversity Policy, PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency

  • Johan Meijer

    Researcher, PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency

  • John Ajjugo

    Policy analyst , HoAREC&N - African Landscapes Dialogue

  • Maiko Nishi

    Research fellow, Satoyama Initiative - United Nations University

  • Nina Bhola

    Senior programme officer, UNEP-WCMC

  • Sophie Persey

    Senior Programme Manager, LandScale, Rainforest Alliance

10:15-11:00
The Borneo Project

Humanity’s destruction of biodiversity creates the perfect conditions for diseases like COVID-19 to emerge. Our lives depend on protecting our forests – not only to prevent future pandemics but also to reverse the impacts of catastrophic climate change. Indigenous communities in Sarawak are hard at work applying local solutions to these immense global challenges by protecting some of the richest tropical rainforests on earth. In this session, learn from grassroots leaders about what Indigenous-managed forest protection looks like on the ground: from investing in village-led research, mapping and forest management, to cancelling the construction of the second largest mega-dam of its kind in the world.

11:00-11:45
Carico Café

Business, the environment and society need to be addressed simultaneously if we are to achieve economic and ecological restoration and a future balance.

Coffee is the second most traded commodity in the world and Uganda, the world’s 6th largest exporter, is home to almost 20% of the world’s coffee smallholding farmers. In Bugisu, on Mount Elgon, the farmers live remotely at high altitude adjacent to a UNESCO Man & Biosphere Reserve. A spiral of worsening deforestation in tandem with aggressive climate events of worsening flash floods and landslides is occurring and is at a point where their last economic activity – coffee farming, is at risk.

Small businesses can experiment in business models and CARICO Café has worked with these communities using their coffee livelihood holistically as a socio-economic-ecological lever. Despite improving quality and yield, driving end-consumer knowledge of origin, livelihoods remain poor.

The session will discuss the value of holistic triple levers to address the challenge of reversal and restoration of biodiversity.
Find this session’s white paper here.

12:00-12:30
The International Forestry Students’ Association (IFSA) with Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

As we proceed through the 21st century and confront today’s biodiversity crisis, we on one hand realize how intertwined our well-being is with our biodiversity and ecosystem health, and on the other hand, we find ourselves immersed in a globalized urban cultural dimension detached from our roots.

  • Tisha Ramadhin

    Community Relations , Fairventures Worldwide FVW Indonesia

Global Landscapes Forum

Learn with forestry experts in Malawi, swim with Indigenous leaders in reef systems off the coast of Mexico and restore the Earth with young people in every landscape.

12:30-12:45
Patagonia

For hundreds of generations, the Gwich’in people of Alaska and northern Canada have depended on the caribou that migrate through the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. With their traditional culture now threatened by oil extraction and climate change, two Gwich’in women are continuing a decades-long fight to protect their land and future.

The Arctic Refuge is home to lands and wildlife vital for the subsistence way of life of Alaska Native communities; and it serves a vital role as a remaining link with the unspoiled natural world and a source of hope for future generations, even for those who may never set foot there.

The Trump administration is proceeding with plans to give oil and gas companies the right to drill in the coastal plain of the Arctic Refuge. Drilling will destroy intact wilderness and violate the human rights of the Gwich’in, who rely on this sacred place to sustain their culture and w

12:45-14:15
World Agroforestry (ICRAF)

This session will highlight the need for recognition of the contributions of mixed, diverse agricultural/agrarian landscapes – not only to biodiversity conservation, but also to the development of more resilient food systems to respond to challenges like those that the world is currently facing. Global policies, such as those of the CBD, have conventionally seen agriculture as a threat to biodiversity. Hence, responses have often focused on promoting the protection of natural ecosystems by concentrating efforts on preventing further expansion of agriculture. We argue that the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework will be seriously flawed if it fails to tackle the effect of food systems and agriculture on biodiversity, or fails to bring farmers into the alliance towards biodiversity conservation and sustainable production. ICRAF and GIZ are the main organizing partners for this session. The CBD Secretariat, IUCN, national representatives, a representative of the private sector and a farmers’ representative will also participate.
Find this session’s white paper here.

  • Alka Bhargava

    Additional Secretary, Ministry of Agricultural Cooperation and Farmers Welfare, Government of India

  • Lorena Frier

    Regional Manager Asia, PUR Projet

  • Thomas Jacob

    Advisor, Peermade Development Society Organic Spices

  • Peter Zens

    Director, Nutrition and Consumption, Cologne Climate Council

  • Tobias Ludes

    Programme Manager, Business and Biodiversity, Global Nature Fund

Sustainable District Association (LTKL)

This session will discuss how jurisdictions with sustainability commitments can restore biodiversity and ecosystem values through a nature-based economy that enhances the value of local sustainable products and services sourced from healthy ecological areas. Representatives from government, civil society, community and the private sector will discuss progress in building a nature-based economy through jurisdictional approaches at the district level in Indonesia. To harness global support for LTKL member districts, the panel brings perspectives from partners working in Southeast Asia and Latin America. Insights from this panel will inform other jurisdictions embarking on similar journeys. The session will close by launching the first LTKL jurisdictional profile for Sintang district.
Find this session’s white paper here.

  • Eka Chandra Buana

    Director for Macro Planning and Statistical Analysis, Indonesia Ministry of National Development Planning

  • Musrahmad

    Founder, ExploreSiak

  • Amy Duchelle

    Senior Scientist in the Climate Change, Energy & Low Carbon Development Team , CIFOR

  • Florentinus Anum

    Head of District Government Sintang in West Kalimantan , Province of Indonesia

  • Nurdiana Darus

    Head of Corporate Affairs and Sustainability, Unilever Indonesia

  • Sanjiv Louis

    Investment Director for SE Asia, Sail Ventures

Central Africa Forest Observatory (OFAC) with COMIFAC, European Union, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Biopama, IUCN, Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD), UCL (Louvain), FMR, OACPS, ECOFAC

Since 2007, the Central African Forest Observatory (OFAC) has been working to create information networks, establish analytical and communication tools, and produce flagship regional publications to provide reliable, relevant and accessible data on the state of Central Africa’s forests.

The session will interactively present the different tools available for policymakers, researchers, NGOs, donors, private sector and students working in the region to obtain information related to biodiversity and forest management.

  • Florence Palla

    Regional coordinator , OFAC support project (RIOFAC)

  • Donald Djossi

    Data management analyst , COMIFAC

  • Quentin Jungers

    Technical Assistant , OFAC Information System (RIOFAC)

  • Tanya Merceron

    Regional coordinator , BIOPAMA-IUCN program

  • Richard Eba'a Atyi

    Senior Scientist and Hub Leader, CIFOR

  • Raymond Ndomba Ngoye

    Executive Secretary, Central African Forest Commission (COMIFAC)

  • Philippe Mayaux

    Head of sector Biodiversity and ecosystem services - Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development (DG DEVCO), European Commission

  • Honoré Tabuna

    Commissioner for the Environment, Natural Resources, Agriculture and Rural Development, Economic Community, Central African States (CEEAC)

Central Africa Forest Observatory (OFAC) with COMIFAC, European Union, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Biopama, IUCN, Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD), UCL (Louvain), FMR

Depuis 2007, l’Observatoire des forêts d’Afrique centrale (OFAC) agit pour créer des réseaux d’information, mettre en place des outils d’analyse et de communication, et produire des publications régionales pour fournir des données fiables, pertinentes et accessibles sur l’état des forêts d’Afrique centrale.

La session présentera de manière interactive les différents outils disponibles pour les décideurs, les chercheurs, les ONG, les bailleurs, le secteur privé et les étudiants engagés dans la région pour obtenir des informations relatives à la biodiversité et à la gestion des forêts.

14:30-15:00
The Global EverGreening Alliance

More than ever, we are realizing how interconnected we are. Public health, biodiversity, and ecosystem restoration are interconnected. Biodiversity underpins life on Earth; it protects our health and wellbeing and it is up to us to restore it.

  • Chris Armitage

    CEO, Global EverGreening Alliance

  • Fred Stolle

    Deputy Director, Forests Program, World Resources Institute (WRI)

  • Winfrida J. Kipondya

    Monitoring, Evaluation Evidence and learning Coordinator, Care Tanzania

  • Talia Liney

    Monitoring and data systems, Global Evergreening Alliance

Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

The Amazon, the Earth’s largest and most diverse rainforest, biodiversity hotspot and home to many indigenous communities, is on fire. The majority of these fires are not wildfires – they are ignited and can often be traced back to illegal forest clearing to create land for monocultures and support the increasing demand for commodities such as soy, coffee, cocoa and palm oil. Fires are just one of the impacts that monocultures have on the Amazons. During this Youth Daily Show, the Youth in Landscapes Initiative discusses with young experts from the Latin America Region the impacts of monocultures on the health of the local ecosystem and its biodiversity, as well as the health and food security of local communities.

14:30-15:15

While the world seems to get further entangled in a web of concurrent crises, there are a growing number of leaders and experts who are sparking new hope and trust in the future. GLF took the effort to find the experts sharing their visions on the state of biodiversity and gathered them in a single digital space to share their inspirational knowledge. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to listen in, learn and get inspired on why biodiversity is essential to building back better.

15:00-15:10
Patagonia

Growing food and fiber with industrial techniques has devastated our climate. Conventional agriculture contributes up to 25% of the emissions driving the climate crisis. But there’s another way. Regenerative organic methods can build healthy soil which helps draw carbon back in the ground.

Because healthy soil traps carbon, many believe that regenerative organic farming methods have the potential to change the way we grow food and fiber and restore the health of our soil and climate. These practices help build healthy soil that could help draw down more carbon from the atmosphere than conventional methods. Regenerative organic agriculture could be a viable way to help stop climate change before it’s too late.

15:15-16:45
Climate Focus

The New York Declaration on Forests (NYDF) aims to halt natural forest loss by 2030, contributing to climate, biodiversity, and sustainable development goals. The session will cover the findings of the 2020 NYDF Assessment on extractive industries and infrastructure. A panel discussion will address the urgent need for transforming approaches to planning and implementing large-scale development projects and the role of forests and the NYDF post-2020. The discussion will focus on promoting transparency and accountability in mining and infrastructure sectors; safeguarding Indigenous peoples’ rights; building incentives for responsible sourcing; and reshaping the NYDF and international commitments.

Read the White Paper here.

  • Vinamra Mathur

    Regional Director for Asia-Pacific, Youth4Nature

  • Erin D. Matson

    Senior Consultant, Climate Focus

  • Diego Moreno

    Director of Environmental Control of the Ministry of Environment and Water, Government of Ecuador

  • Laura George

    Advocacy and Rights Coordinator, Amerindian Peoples Association

  • Marcela Bocchetto

    Manager Biodiversity and Climate Change, Anglo American

  • Pippa Howard

    Director of the Business & Biodiversity Programme, Flora and Fauna International

True Nature Foundation

Rewilding is a new, (pro)active approach to biodiversity conservation. Restoring ecosystems is key to our public health and mental well-being, and vital in the fight against climate change and mass extinction. The goal of this session is to discuss and promote sound models of rewilding, in order to reach and maintain a favourable level of health for habitats and species. Can we bring back natural processes while promoting socio-economic development and supporting rural communities? In this session, we share experiences with rewilding projects, and look at possible funding and income-generating mechanisms that contribute to healthy, life-supporting landscapes and rural development.

Find this session’s white paper here.

Resilient Landscapes

Biological diversity celebrates its 3.7 billionth birthday this year. From common ancestors, all forms of life sprang up from a few grams of the same chemical building blocks. But “biodiversity” as a word is only 35 years’ old this year having been coined by E.O. Wilson and other ecologists in 1985. The term “biodiversity” is now co-owned by scientists, politicians, philanthropists and civil society – but has only recently become a priority of the corporate sector and private investors.

Biodiversity is a bit nebulous. Few convincing answers are evident for the commercial world on questions such as: what are the most important assets of biodiversity and what is the return on investment in biodiversity? At the same time, businesses do understand emerging risks and liabilities if biodiversity is ignored. We have not adequately answered the related question on how can business and biodiversity mutually benefit each other? Resilient Landscapes seeks to answer that question in agricultural and forest landscapes through engaging with interested private sector and investment actors.

Today, agriculture accounts for 70% of the projected loss of terrestrial biodiversity. It contributes to 50% of the topsoil lost. We use 40% of Earth’s land surface to produce food, making it the single largest cause of deforestation, habitat and biodiversity loss. Yet with the world’s population rising, we will need to double food production by 2050. Given the arable land available, current “business as usual” models are insufficient.

At the same time, half of the world’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), €40 trillion, depends on nature.[1] The world already loses an estimated €5.5-10.5 trillion per year from land degradation and biodiversity loss further puts our food systems and nutrition at risk[2].

Addressing the current biodiversity crisis is crucial to planetary and ecological health. Preliminary research indicates that significant biodiversity loss results in a greater transmissibility of human diseases, which can be seen from a substantial increase in zoonosis, including SARS, Ebola, Lyme and COVID-19. In doing so, public-private partnerships will play a crucial role in supporting commitment to action toward financing biodiversity.

Furthermore, there is growing recognition that public funds are insufficient to reverse biodiversity loss. A report recently released by the Paulson Institute shows that the funding gap for biodiversity is $700 billion per year for the next decade. The financial sector has a critical role in addressing the global biodiversity crisis, while governments and regulators hold the key to harnessing the power of the financial sector to mobilize private finance at scale to protect nature[3].

[1] EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030
[2] EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030
[3] Mobilizing Private Finance for Nature, World Bank Group Report


Introduction & Welcome remarks: Leona Liu, Deputy-Director, Resilient Landscapes (03:00)

Keynote Address by Video: Prof. Thomas Lovejoy, University Professor of Environmental Science and Policy of George Mason University (02:17)
Keynote Address: Gonzalo Munoz, COP25 High-Level Champion – (03:00)

Panel One: Natural Capital Appreciation

Moderator Introductions: Christopher Knowles, Senior Advisor, Environment & Climate Finance
Resilient Landscapes (05:00)
Facilitated Panel: Supporting biodiversity and resilient landscapes through innovative finance mechanisms
1. Jaspreet Stamm, Director, Finance in Motion (05:00)
2. Andre van den Beld, Head Sustainability – Cocoa at Export Trading Group (ETG) (05:00)
3. Martin Geiger, Director Sustainability and Corporate Governance, DEG Deutsche Investitions- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft mbH (05:00)
4. Fabian Huwlyer, Founding Partner, Posaidon Capital(05:00)

Closing Remarks & Transition to Panel Two: Christopher Knowles, Senior Advisor, Environment & Climate Finance, Resilient Landscapes (03:00)


Panel Two: Supply Chains & Biodiversity in the post COVID-19 Era

Moderator Introductions: Howard-Yana Shapiro, Senior Advisor, Private Sector & Markets, Resilient Landscapes, Distinguished Senior Fellow, CIFOR-ICRAF (05:00)

Facilitated Panel: Biodiversity & Agricultural Landscapes

1. Jason Clay, Senior Vice President, Markets, Executive Director, Markets Institute, WWF (05:00)

Topics: 1. Nexus between biodiversity and resilient landscapes; 2. Improvement of certification through the new Agricultural Performance System

2. Susan Chomba, Project Manager, Regreening Africa, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) (05:00)

Topics: 1. Re-greening Africa and the new Agricultural Performance System; 2. Biodiversity & Resilient Landscapes

3. Mette Wilkie, Director, Forestry Division, FAO (05:00)

Topics: 1. Value of forests in terms of benefits to livelihoods; 2. FAO’s SOFO 2020 and the need for the call to action on biodiversity efforts
Closing remarks: Tony Simons, Director General, World Agroforestry (ICRAF) , Executive Director, CIFOR-ICRAF (05:00)

17:00-17:45
Nia Tero

Indigenous peoples are the time-immemorial guardians of many of the world’s remaining biodiversity-rich landscapes – and of the spirituality, values and worldviews embedded in these physical spaces. As human encroachments threaten Indigenous ways of life and connection to land, the world urgently needs to find ways to support this guardianship to help ensure the health of the planet and diversity of species. This interactive plenary will amplify the voices of Indigenous guardians, and will provide a platform for civil society groups, the private sector, policy-makers, local authorities and youth to discuss and explore processes that draw from Indigenous peoples and local communities’ knowledge to generate scalable solutions to contemporary challenges. These solutions will be rooted in reciprocity, will help to achieve human and ecological well-being, and will promote just and sustainable decision-making that restores harmony between people and nature.
Find this session’s white paper here.

17:45-19:10
Global Landscapes Forum

Two days of dialogue and debate will compel participants to get ready for a strong call to global action. But what action is most urgently needed? So many of us are pleading for transformative change – but what does this require? Experts will discuss the need for a fundamental, system-wide change across technological, economic and social factors, including changing paradigms, goals and values. To achieve this, we must move away from looking at biodiversity as a production factor to seeing it as an integral part of life, without which we cannot survive. Moving from an economy of exploitation to an economy of restoration will require individual and collective behavioural change.

The Closing Plenary will be opened by Elizabeth Mrema, Executive Secretary of the CBD and will start with a conversation between Christiane Paulus, Director General at BMU, Carla Montesi, Director at DEVCO and Carlos Rodriguez, CEO of GEF, before moving to a dynamic panel of representatives from youth, government, business, civil society and indigenous people.
Participants will join the discussion and contribute to the transformative change which we will initiate here.

  • Christiane Paulus

    Director General, Nature Conservation and Sustainable Use of Natural Resources, German Ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU)

  • Elizabeth Mrema

    Executive Secretary , UN Convention on Biological Diversity

  • Carla Montesi

    Director , European Commission’s Directorate General for Development and Cooperation

  • Carlos Manuel Rodriguez

    CEO and Chairperson, Global Environment Facility

  • Melina Sakiyama

    Co-Founder, Global Youth Biodiversity Network (GYBN)

  • Yvonne Aki Sawyerr

    Mayor of Freetown , Sierra Leone

  • Mwambu Wanendeya

    CEO and Founder, Carico

  • Peter Daszak

    President, EcoHealth Alliance

  • Benki Piyãko

    Ashaninka Community Leader, Terra Kampa do Rio Amônia

  • Robert Nasi

    Director General, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Managing Director, CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Rodrigo A. Medellin

    Senior Professor, Ecology and Biodiversity Department , Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

  • Khairani Barokka

    Writer, poet and artist, NYU Tisch Departmental Fellow

19:15-20:00

Join us for an informal facilitated networking session. Guided by conversational menus you will have the opportunity to connect with fellow conference participants in short breakout sessions of 10 minutes each. These sessions are limited to 1,000 participants, on a first come, first served basis.

GLF Biodiversity – Networking Menu Session 1

Patagonia

Takayna/Tarkine in northwestern Tasmania is home to one of the last tracts of old-growth rainforest in the world, yet it’s currently at the mercy of destructive extraction industries, including logging and mining. This documentary, presented by Patagonia Films, unpacks the complexities of modern conservation and challenges us to consider the importance of our last wild places.

Visit the digital exhibition booths, brought to you by leading environmental and grassroots organizations. Connect and learn with 25 booths, open 24/7. In Whova, under Exhibitions.

Bonn: UTC/GMT +1

28 October 2020

07:30-08:00
Young Professionals for Agricultural Development (YPARD) with Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

Agriculture is the main income source for most rural households in Asia and the Pacific region. However, the increasing biodiversity loss due to climate change represents a huge threat to people’s livelihoods, the consequences of which could be even more dangerous than the COVID-19 pandemic. To promote youth engagement in biodiversity protection toward achieving the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, this Youth Daily Show – led by Young Professionals for Agricultural Development (YPARD) in collaboration with the Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) – will explore what young Indigenous people working in agriculture are doing to preserve biodiversity

08:00-08:45

Join us for an informal facilitated networking session. Guided by conversational menus you will have the opportunity to connect with fellow conference participants in short breakout sessions of 10 minutes each. These sessions are limited to 1,000 participants, on a first come, first served basis.

GLF Biodiversity – Networking Menu Session 2

Visit the digital exhibition booths, brought to you by leading environmental and grassroots organizations. Connect and learn with 25 booths, open 24/7. In Whova, under Exhibitions.

09:00-10:30
CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry (FTA) with FAO

Biodiversity is already a well-recognized element of sustainable forest management (SFM). The role of forests in maintaining biodiversity is also explicitly recognized by the UN Strategic Plan for Forests 2017-2030. The purpose of this session is to discuss the state of mainstreaming biodiversity in the forest sector, take stock of existing concepts and tools for integrating biodiversity in forest management and make recommendations for future actions. The results of the discussion will inform the research of FTA as well as preparatory work  towards the implementation of FAO’s Strategy on Biodiversity Mainstreaming across Agricultural Sectors.

The International Livestock Research Institute

The COVID-19 pandemic highlights the power zoonoses have to disrupt our economies, public health and food systems. In response to this, One Health has grown as an approach for addressing the current inadequacies in responses to such global health crises, as well as playing an important role in addressing and mitigating climate change and biodiversity loss. This panel will highlight why those promoting a landscape approach should pay greater attention to landscape health and its relationship with animal (livestock and wildlife) and human health, as part of an integrated One Health approach. If landscape policies and investments continue to be made without taking into account a One Health lens, they will miss opportunities to contribute to addressing the biggest challenges of our time.

German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE)

The zoonotic origins of COVID 19 and countries’ reactions to the pandemic raise important questions about the future of protected areas. First, does the threat of virus spillover events after all call for a stricter separation of nature and people despite all justified criticism of fortress conservation approaches? Second, how can conservation funding cope with dumps in international wildlife tourism? We will discuss these questions in the format of a digital roundtable with experts in protected areas from different backgrounds. We will include practical examples of the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on protected areas and aim to provide policy-oriented conclusions that could feed into the protected areas work at the upcoming IUCN World Conservation Congress and CBD COP 15.

Find this session’s white paper here.

  • Anna Spenceley

    Board Member, Global Sustainable Tourism Council

  • Adrian Martin

    Professor, School of International Development, University of East Anglia

  • Herbert Lust

    Senior Vice President of Global Public Partnerships and Senior Vice President and Managing Director, Conservation International Europe

  • Maricela Fernández

    Indigenous Cabécar leader

10:45-12:15
Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) with The Tenure Facility, Forest Peoples Programme

The environment, climate change, biodiversity, health, the economy – we face multiple crises. Deforestation and ecosystem degradation have not lost their momentum – we are losing biodiversity fast, reducing our ability to use land-based solutions. Mono-causal solutions have not worked for these interconnected problems. This interactive and informative session will invite the audience to learn and explore, with experts from science and indigenous peoples, how to deliver a green, just recovery: How are biodiversity and climate change linked? How can rights-based approaches protect and fully restore ecological functionality? Which policy processes and finances are needed? Where are the priorities?

Patagonia

Artifishal is a film about people, rivers, and the fight for the future of wild fish and the environment that supports them. It explores wild salmon’s slide toward extinction, threats posed by fish hatcheries and fish farms, and our continued loss of faith in nature.

12:30-13:00
Global Youth Biodiversity Network with Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

Years from now, historians will be discussing the reality we are living and the tomorrow we are defining. What will they call this age? The age of climate denial, the age of biodiversity loss or could it possible be the age of collective action? In a critical moment for the planet and all its peoples, the IPBES 2019 Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, suggest that we all get on the train of Transformative Change – a profound, fundamental, system-wide and strategic change in discourses, actions, values and policy. 

15:00-15:45
The United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration (UN Decade)

Aware of the critical state of degradation of ecosystems worldwide, on 1 March 2019, under Resolution 73/284, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 2021 – 2030 to be the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration. The resolution calls for supporting and scaling up efforts to prevent, halt and reverse the degradation of ecosystems worldwide, as well as to raise awareness of the importance of ecosystem restoration. UNEP and FAO are the lead implementing UN agencies of the Decade and therefore, to support its implementation, a Task Force on Best Practices (TF) has been established involving a group of 85 individuals from 32 global leading organizations in the field of knowledge capitalization and dissemination. Led by FAO, this group is in charge of setting the ground for future efforts on knowledge capitalization and dissemination as well as the identification of new knowledge products, proposing an action plan for scientific research over the course of the Decade.

  • Christophe Besacier

    Senior Forestry Officer, Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism Forestry Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Faustine Zoveda

    Forestry Officer, Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism Forestry Division , Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Vera Boerger

    Senior Land and Water Officer, Land and Water Division (NSL) , FAO

  • Kathleen Buckingham

    Senior Manager, Social Research, Data and Innovation, Global Restoration Initiative, World Resources Institute

  • Robin Chazdon

    Research and Consultant, Forestoration International

The Amazon Conservation Team

Once, conservation organizations and multilateral institutions regarded many remote indigenous and rural cultures as groups requiring relocation or “development” according to Western parameters. The 21st century has seen a burgeoning awareness that neither alternative is desirable. Nonetheless, there exists a relative dearth of examples of how best to partner with these increasingly imperiled communities to help protect their forests and their cultures as modernity presses in on all sides. This session focuses on successful efforts in northern Amazonia to help forest communities seize control of their destinies while developing a broader governance vision for indigenous stewardship that emphasizes nonlinear economies.

16:00-17:30
Sustainable Wildlife Management with Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD), OACPS, Funded by the European Union

The session will launch the White Paper and Policy Brief “Build Back Better in a post-COVID world – Reducing future wildlife-borne spillover of disease to humans” produced by the Sustainable Wildlife Management Programme. Presenters will discuss alternative strategies to tackle the drivers of zoonotic disease emergence and their spread along wildlife value chains. They will emphasize the need to consider and involve the millions of citizens, communities and Indigenous People who rely on wildlife for food, income and cultural identity. Discussions will focus on how to encourage policy dialogue and coordinated targeted investments to prevent, detect and respond to future pandemics.

  • Philippe Mayaux, Head of sector Biodiversity and ecosystem services – Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development (DG DEVCO) – European Commission 
  • Michelle Edgardine Ngwapaza, Deputy General Director and National focal point for the SWM Programme in Gabon – Wildlife and Protected Areas General Directorate (DGFAP), Ministry of waters, forests, sea and environment, in charge of Climate Plan and Land Use Plan – Republic of Gabon (Central Africa) 
  • Nickolas Fredericks, Current Toshao (indigenous village chief) for Shulinab village. Current chairman of the National Toshaos Council, the highest representative body for Indigenous Peoples in Guyana 
  • Nathalie van Vliet, Associate researcher – Site Coordinator SWM Programme Guyana – CIFOR 
  • Amanda Fine, Associate Director, Wildlife Health Programme WCS 
  • Marisa Peyre, Deputy Head ASTRE research unit – CIRAD 
  • Keith Sumption, Chief Veterinary Officer and Leader of the Animal Health Programme at FAO Director of the Joint Centre for Zoonoses and Anti-Microbial Resistance (CJWZ) 

Find this session’s white paper here.

  • Maria Helena Semedo

    Deputy Director-General, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Philippe Mayaux

    Head of sector Biodiversity and ecosystem services - Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development (DG DEVCO), European Commission

  • Michelle Edgardine Ngwapaza

    Deputy General Director & National focal point for the SWM Programme in Gabon - Wildlife and Protected Areas General Directorate (DGFAP), Ministry of waters, forests, sea and environment, in charge of Climate Plan and Land Use Plan – Republic of Gabon (Central Africa)

  • Nickolas Fredericks

    Current Toshao (indigenous village chief) for Shulinab village. Current chairman of the National Toshaos Council, the highest representative body for Indigenous Peoples in Guyana , Current chairman for the South Rupununi District Council (a representative body for the 21 Southern Rupununi indigenous communities)

  • Amanda Fine

    Associate Director, Wildlife Health Programme WCS

  • Marisa Peyre

    Deputy Head, ASTRE research unit, CIRAD

  • Keith Sumption

    Chief Veterinary Officer and Leader of the Animal Health Programme at FAO , Director of the Joint Centre for Zoonoses and Anti-Microbial Resistance (CJWZ)

  • Cristelle Pratt

    Assistant Secretary-General, Department of Environment and Climate Action, Organisation of African, Caribbean and Pacific States

Global Crop Diversity Trust

Our global food systems depend on agrobiodiversity – that is, the vast diversity of crops, trees and livestock that underpins our entire agricultural system, make it less vulnerable to pests and diseases, and contribute to landscape restoration and resilience in the midst of the climate crisis. Through Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Target 2.5, we have pledged to ensure the conservation and sustainable use of all our agrobiodiversity by 2020. However, even though we have made significant strides towards hitting the target, we are still far from implementation.

  • Charlotte Lusty

    Head of Programmes, Global Crop Diversity Trust

  • Desterio Nyamongo

    Senior Principal Research Officer and Director, Genetic Resources Research Institute Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization

  • Lavernee Gueco

    Researcher - College of Agriculture and Food Science , University of Los Banos - The Philippines

  • Vania Azevedo

    Head, Genebank, ICRISAT

  • Nelissa Jamora

    Agricultural Economist

  • Maarten van Zonneveld

    Genebank Manager, World Vegetable Center

  • Filippo Bassi

    Senior Scientist, International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas

  • Alejandro Argumedo

    Program Director, Asociación ANDES

  • Shivali Sharma

    Theme Leader, Pre-breeding; and Senior Scientist – Genetic Resources at ICRISAT-Hyderabad

  • Maria Andrade

    Scientist and World Food Prize Laureate, International Potato Center

Global Peatlands Initiative with UN Environment Programme (UNEP), Greifswald Mire Centre, Tompkins Conservation

This session will take you on a two-part peatlands journey to some of the most rare, remote and unique places in the world. Many peatlands offer a safe haven for rare and threatened biodiversity – from the orangutan of Indonesia to the golden sphagnum moss of Northern Ireland. Transport yourself to the remote forested swamps of the Congo Basin and then onward to the tip of the South American continent. Peatlands also offer vital stopping-off points for migratory species – connecting species to special places across the globe. Peatlands can also be carbon-packed micro-rainforests that house bizarre creatures and tales of the past. UNEP invites you to discover why peatlands are a critical habitat for biodiversity and what they offer to our climate and our health. This world tour will provide examples and share experiences and strategies, while highlighting the important role that partnerships can play in safeguarding biodiversity.
Find this session’s white paper here.

17:45-19:15
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) on behalf of the German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) as part of the International Climate Initiative (IKI) with World Agroforestry (ICRAF), International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Global Nature Fund

To implement the Post-2020 Biodiversity Framework, a major challenge will be to customize and redesign financial instruments to ensure that investment plans are evaluated for their potential risk to nature, or to create incentives for biodiversity-friendly investment into value chains. The session will bring together expert practitioners from the public and private sectors in multiple continents to discuss existing approaches in the field of financial instruments, good practices and lessons learned, as well as how to bring successful approaches to scale and how to link COVID-19 response measures to financing for a biodiversity-friendly future.
Find this session’s white paper here.

WWF

The triple challenge is the imperative to simultaneously deliver a stable climate, recovering biodiversity and healthy food for 10 billion people by 2050. Building on discussions at the GLF Bonn in June, this event advances thinking on the concept further, and explores the implications through a deep dive into the case of the Greater Virunga Landscape. In the Virunga landscape this triple challenge looms large, as does the risk of disease transmission between both wildlife and humans, making the One Health approach essential. The discussion will combine speakers from the landscape with external experts and the audience to explore how to negotiate and balance these challenges.

World Bank

The COVID pandemic has brought new attention to the importance of landscape health for human health in addition to economic resilience. The transfer of zoonotic diseases from animals to humans makes clear the interdependence of human and animal health on terrestrial ecosystems, and the risks of ecosystem degradation due to human activity. Healthy landscapes are also critical for healthy economies, providing essential ecosystem services such as water, fertile soil, and erosion prevention. In many places, nature and wildlife provide the basis for nature-based tourism (NBT) that provides important income for protected area management and for jobs for local communities.

This session will look at pathways for spillover of zoonotic diseases such as COVID-19 from animals to humans, what actions can manage or stop spill over and how a One Health approach that looks at human, animal and environmental health together can make a difference. The session will also explore tools that can help bring back NBT as the world recovers from COVID-19, how restoration is important to human health, and how approaches to landscape management are evolving to encompass health considerations.

29 October 2020

07:30-08:15
Facilitated networking LIVE NOW

Join us for an informal facilitated networking session. Guided by conversational menus you will have the opportunity to connect with fellow conference participants in short breakout sessions of 10 minutes each. These sessions are limited to 1,000 participants, on a first come, first served basis.

GLF Biodiversity – Networking Menu Session 3

Visit the digital exhibition booths, brought to you by leading environmental and grassroots organizations. Connect and learn with 25 booths, open 24/7. In Whova, under Exhibitions.

08:30-10:00
World Overview of Conservation Approaches and Technologies (WOCAT) with International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), Global Environment Facility (GEF), WWF, UN Environment Programme (UNEP), The International Livestock Research Institute, Somos Territorio ABC, Wajari, Department of Wildlife Protection Leh

Rangelands (grassland, savannahs and silvo-pastoral systems) in dry areas and mountains account for the largest global restoration opportunities for ecosystems, human and environmental health, and economic growth.

Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)

Integrated landscape approaches feature prominently in recent UN conventions as promoted strategies to address inter-connected social, political, economic and environmental challenges in tropical frontier landscapes. However, evidence of their effectiveness remains poorly researched, reported and understood. This session will address this gap through a book launch that showcases COLANDS initiatives that are implementing integrated landscape approaches in Ghana, Zambia, and Indonesia. Speakers will share their experiences of conceptualizing, designing and implementing landscape approaches, including: why biodiversity needs to be integrated within landscape approaches, how better governance can be achieved, what evaluation approaches are appropriate and how to bridge sectorial, disciplinary and knowledge system divides.

Find the book here
Find this session’s white paper here.

09:15-10:00

Journey to Malaysian Borneo with The Borneo Project to learn about the rare wildlife of this unique island and see how local communities are involved in documenting and maintaining forest health! Join Fi, Bryan, Shahnaz, and Jettie on an exploration of the rainforests of the Baram River Basin to learn about a community-led project to document the endemic species of this ecosystem. This extraordinary, remote land is home to the Orang Ulu, which roughly means “people of the interior”, a term that includes many different indigenous groups. Together we will discuss how community-led forest protection is an essential tool in maintaining biodiversity, and we will even see some of the rare species that have evolved to suit this particular climate. It’s everything you could want from an exotic eco-tour, minus the mosquitos and humidity!

10:15-11:45
ICIMOD

The Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region extends across eight countries from Afghanistan in the west to Myanmar in the east, crossing Pakistan, India, China, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. It is a globally important resource – biologically and culturally rich, it provides ecosystem goods and services to a quarter of the world’s population. The HKH is the Pulse of the Planet – what happens here affects the rest of the world. This session will explain why the HKH is the Pulse of the Planet and the need to reinforce positive relations between biodiversity, landscapes, culture and health in a post-COVID ‘new normal’.

Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) with Satoyama Initiative, LandScale, UNU-IAS, HoARECN – African Landscape Dialogue

The new CBD Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework (GBF) will build on a theory of change aiming for transformative shifts and involving the whole of society. Landscape-based initiatives and approaches across the globe have evidenced the potential contribution of non-state actors in achieving global goals. Landscape governance arrangements are complementary to existing CBD approaches, and align with the GBF objectives. This session will highlight and discuss the role of landscape approaches and arrangements undertaken by non-state actors to support the GBF, discuss how policies could support this and illustrate the potential for area-based non-state actor GBF commitments and verification.

Knowledge products:

  • Marcel Kok

    Programme leader, International Biodiversity Policy, PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency

  • Johan Meijer

    Researcher, PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency

  • John Ajjugo

    Policy analyst , HoAREC&N - African Landscapes Dialogue

  • Maiko Nishi

    Research fellow, Satoyama Initiative - United Nations University

  • Nina Bhola

    Senior programme officer, UNEP-WCMC

  • Sophie Persey

    Senior Programme Manager, LandScale, Rainforest Alliance

10:15-11:00
The Borneo Project

Humanity’s destruction of biodiversity creates the perfect conditions for diseases like COVID-19 to emerge. Our lives depend on protecting our forests – not only to prevent future pandemics but also to reverse the impacts of catastrophic climate change. Indigenous communities in Sarawak are hard at work applying local solutions to these immense global challenges by protecting some of the richest tropical rainforests on earth. In this session, learn from grassroots leaders about what Indigenous-managed forest protection looks like on the ground: from investing in village-led research, mapping and forest management, to cancelling the construction of the second largest mega-dam of its kind in the world.

11:00-11:45
Carico Café

Business, the environment and society need to be addressed simultaneously if we are to achieve economic and ecological restoration and a future balance.

Coffee is the second most traded commodity in the world and Uganda, the world’s 6th largest exporter, is home to almost 20% of the world’s coffee smallholding farmers. In Bugisu, on Mount Elgon, the farmers live remotely at high altitude adjacent to a UNESCO Man & Biosphere Reserve. A spiral of worsening deforestation in tandem with aggressive climate events of worsening flash floods and landslides is occurring and is at a point where their last economic activity – coffee farming, is at risk.

Small businesses can experiment in business models and CARICO Café has worked with these communities using their coffee livelihood holistically as a socio-economic-ecological lever. Despite improving quality and yield, driving end-consumer knowledge of origin, livelihoods remain poor.

The session will discuss the value of holistic triple levers to address the challenge of reversal and restoration of biodiversity.
Find this session’s white paper here.

12:00-12:30
The International Forestry Students’ Association (IFSA) with Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

As we proceed through the 21st century and confront today’s biodiversity crisis, we on one hand realize how intertwined our well-being is with our biodiversity and ecosystem health, and on the other hand, we find ourselves immersed in a globalized urban cultural dimension detached from our roots.

  • Tisha Ramadhin

    Community Relations , Fairventures Worldwide FVW Indonesia

12:30-12:45
Patagonia

For hundreds of generations, the Gwich’in people of Alaska and northern Canada have depended on the caribou that migrate through the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. With their traditional culture now threatened by oil extraction and climate change, two Gwich’in women are continuing a decades-long fight to protect their land and future.

The Arctic Refuge is home to lands and wildlife vital for the subsistence way of life of Alaska Native communities; and it serves a vital role as a remaining link with the unspoiled natural world and a source of hope for future generations, even for those who may never set foot there.

The Trump administration is proceeding with plans to give oil and gas companies the right to drill in the coastal plain of the Arctic Refuge. Drilling will destroy intact wilderness and violate the human rights of the Gwich’in, who rely on this sacred place to sustain their culture and w

12:45-14:15
World Agroforestry (ICRAF)

This session will highlight the need for recognition of the contributions of mixed, diverse agricultural/agrarian landscapes – not only to biodiversity conservation, but also to the development of more resilient food systems to respond to challenges like those that the world is currently facing. Global policies, such as those of the CBD, have conventionally seen agriculture as a threat to biodiversity. Hence, responses have often focused on promoting the protection of natural ecosystems by concentrating efforts on preventing further expansion of agriculture. We argue that the Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework will be seriously flawed if it fails to tackle the effect of food systems and agriculture on biodiversity, or fails to bring farmers into the alliance towards biodiversity conservation and sustainable production. ICRAF and GIZ are the main organizing partners for this session. The CBD Secretariat, IUCN, national representatives, a representative of the private sector and a farmers’ representative will also participate.
Find this session’s white paper here.

Sustainable District Association (LTKL)

This session will discuss how jurisdictions with sustainability commitments can restore biodiversity and ecosystem values through a nature-based economy that enhances the value of local sustainable products and services sourced from healthy ecological areas. Representatives from government, civil society, community and the private sector will discuss progress in building a nature-based economy through jurisdictional approaches at the district level in Indonesia. To harness global support for LTKL member districts, the panel brings perspectives from partners working in Southeast Asia and Latin America. Insights from this panel will inform other jurisdictions embarking on similar journeys. The session will close by launching the first LTKL jurisdictional profile for Sintang district.
Find this session’s white paper here.

Central Africa Forest Observatory (OFAC) with COMIFAC, European Union, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Biopama, IUCN, Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD), UCL (Louvain), FMR, OACPS, ECOFAC

Since 2007, the Central African Forest Observatory (OFAC) has been working to create information networks, establish analytical and communication tools, and produce flagship regional publications to provide reliable, relevant and accessible data on the state of Central Africa’s forests.

The session will interactively present the different tools available for policymakers, researchers, NGOs, donors, private sector and students working in the region to obtain information related to biodiversity and forest management.

  • Florence Palla

    Regional coordinator , OFAC support project (RIOFAC)

  • Donald Djossi

    Data management analyst , COMIFAC

  • Quentin Jungers

    Technical Assistant , OFAC Information System (RIOFAC)

  • Tanya Merceron

    Regional coordinator , BIOPAMA-IUCN program

  • Richard Eba'a Atyi

    Senior Scientist and Hub Leader, CIFOR

  • Raymond Ndomba Ngoye

    Executive Secretary, Central African Forest Commission (COMIFAC)

  • Philippe Mayaux

    Head of sector Biodiversity and ecosystem services - Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development (DG DEVCO), European Commission

  • Honoré Tabuna

    Commissioner for the Environment, Natural Resources, Agriculture and Rural Development, Economic Community, Central African States (CEEAC)

Central Africa Forest Observatory (OFAC) with COMIFAC, European Union, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Biopama, IUCN, Agricultural Research for Development (CIRAD), UCL (Louvain), FMR

Depuis 2007, l’Observatoire des forêts d’Afrique centrale (OFAC) agit pour créer des réseaux d’information, mettre en place des outils d’analyse et de communication, et produire des publications régionales pour fournir des données fiables, pertinentes et accessibles sur l’état des forêts d’Afrique centrale.

La session présentera de manière interactive les différents outils disponibles pour les décideurs, les chercheurs, les ONG, les bailleurs, le secteur privé et les étudiants engagés dans la région pour obtenir des informations relatives à la biodiversité et à la gestion des forêts.

14:30-15:00
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

The Amazon, the Earth’s largest and most diverse rainforest, biodiversity hotspot and home to many indigenous communities, is on fire. The majority of these fires are not wildfires – they are ignited and can often be traced back to illegal forest clearing to create land for monocultures and support the increasing demand for commodities such as soy, coffee, cocoa and palm oil. Fires are just one of the impacts that monocultures have on the Amazons. During this Youth Daily Show, the Youth in Landscapes Initiative discusses with young experts from the Latin America Region the impacts of monocultures on the health of the local ecosystem and its biodiversity, as well as the health and food security of local communities.

15:00-15:10
Patagonia

Growing food and fiber with industrial techniques has devastated our climate. Conventional agriculture contributes up to 25% of the emissions driving the climate crisis. But there’s another way. Regenerative organic methods can build healthy soil which helps draw carbon back in the ground.

Because healthy soil traps carbon, many believe that regenerative organic farming methods have the potential to change the way we grow food and fiber and restore the health of our soil and climate. These practices help build healthy soil that could help draw down more carbon from the atmosphere than conventional methods. Regenerative organic agriculture could be a viable way to help stop climate change before it’s too late.

15:15-16:45
Climate Focus

The New York Declaration on Forests (NYDF) aims to halt natural forest loss by 2030, contributing to climate, biodiversity, and sustainable development goals. The session will cover the findings of the 2020 NYDF Assessment on extractive industries and infrastructure. A panel discussion will address the urgent need for transforming approaches to planning and implementing large-scale development projects and the role of forests and the NYDF post-2020. The discussion will focus on promoting transparency and accountability in mining and infrastructure sectors; safeguarding Indigenous peoples’ rights; building incentives for responsible sourcing; and reshaping the NYDF and international commitments.

Read the White Paper here.

True Nature Foundation

Rewilding is a new, (pro)active approach to biodiversity conservation. Restoring ecosystems is key to our public health and mental well-being, and vital in the fight against climate change and mass extinction. The goal of this session is to discuss and promote sound models of rewilding, in order to reach and maintain a favourable level of health for habitats and species. Can we bring back natural processes while promoting socio-economic development and supporting rural communities? In this session, we share experiences with rewilding projects, and look at possible funding and income-generating mechanisms that contribute to healthy, life-supporting landscapes and rural development.

Find this session’s white paper here.

Resilient Landscapes

Biological diversity celebrates its 3.7 billionth birthday this year. From common ancestors, all forms of life sprang up from a few grams of the same chemical building blocks. But “biodiversity” as a word is only 35 years’ old this year having been coined by E.O. Wilson and other ecologists in 1985. The term “biodiversity” is now co-owned by scientists, politicians, philanthropists and civil society – but has only recently become a priority of the corporate sector and private investors.

Biodiversity is a bit nebulous. Few convincing answers are evident for the commercial world on questions such as: what are the most important assets of biodiversity and what is the return on investment in biodiversity? At the same time, businesses do understand emerging risks and liabilities if biodiversity is ignored. We have not adequately answered the related question on how can business and biodiversity mutually benefit each other? Resilient Landscapes seeks to answer that question in agricultural and forest landscapes through engaging with interested private sector and investment actors.

Today, agriculture accounts for 70% of the projected loss of terrestrial biodiversity. It contributes to 50% of the topsoil lost. We use 40% of Earth’s land surface to produce food, making it the single largest cause of deforestation, habitat and biodiversity loss. Yet with the world’s population rising, we will need to double food production by 2050. Given the arable land available, current “business as usual” models are insufficient.

At the same time, half of the world’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), €40 trillion, depends on nature.[1] The world already loses an estimated €5.5-10.5 trillion per year from land degradation and biodiversity loss further puts our food systems and nutrition at risk[2].

Addressing the current biodiversity crisis is crucial to planetary and ecological health. Preliminary research indicates that significant biodiversity loss results in a greater transmissibility of human diseases, which can be seen from a substantial increase in zoonosis, including SARS, Ebola, Lyme and COVID-19. In doing so, public-private partnerships will play a crucial role in supporting commitment to action toward financing biodiversity.

Furthermore, there is growing recognition that public funds are insufficient to reverse biodiversity loss. A report recently released by the Paulson Institute shows that the funding gap for biodiversity is $700 billion per year for the next decade. The financial sector has a critical role in addressing the global biodiversity crisis, while governments and regulators hold the key to harnessing the power of the financial sector to mobilize private finance at scale to protect nature[3].

[1] EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030
[2] EU Biodiversity Strategy for 2030
[3] Mobilizing Private Finance for Nature, World Bank Group Report


Introduction & Welcome remarks: Leona Liu, Deputy-Director, Resilient Landscapes (03:00)

Keynote Address by Video: Prof. Thomas Lovejoy, University Professor of Environmental Science and Policy of George Mason University (02:17)
Keynote Address: Gonzalo Munoz, COP25 High-Level Champion – (03:00)

Panel One: Natural Capital Appreciation

Moderator Introductions: Christopher Knowles, Senior Advisor, Environment & Climate Finance
Resilient Landscapes (05:00)
Facilitated Panel: Supporting biodiversity and resilient landscapes through innovative finance mechanisms
1. Jaspreet Stamm, Director, Finance in Motion (05:00)
2. Andre van den Beld, Head Sustainability – Cocoa at Export Trading Group (ETG) (05:00)
3. Martin Geiger, Director Sustainability and Corporate Governance, DEG Deutsche Investitions- und Entwicklungsgesellschaft mbH (05:00)
4. Fabian Huwlyer, Founding Partner, Posaidon Capital(05:00)

Closing Remarks & Transition to Panel Two: Christopher Knowles, Senior Advisor, Environment & Climate Finance, Resilient Landscapes (03:00)


Panel Two: Supply Chains & Biodiversity in the post COVID-19 Era

Moderator Introductions: Howard-Yana Shapiro, Senior Advisor, Private Sector & Markets, Resilient Landscapes, Distinguished Senior Fellow, CIFOR-ICRAF (05:00)

Facilitated Panel: Biodiversity & Agricultural Landscapes

1. Jason Clay, Senior Vice President, Markets, Executive Director, Markets Institute, WWF (05:00)

Topics: 1. Nexus between biodiversity and resilient landscapes; 2. Improvement of certification through the new Agricultural Performance System

2. Susan Chomba, Project Manager, Regreening Africa, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) (05:00)

Topics: 1. Re-greening Africa and the new Agricultural Performance System; 2. Biodiversity & Resilient Landscapes

3. Mette Wilkie, Director, Forestry Division, FAO (05:00)

Topics: 1. Value of forests in terms of benefits to livelihoods; 2. FAO’s SOFO 2020 and the need for the call to action on biodiversity efforts
Closing remarks: Tony Simons, Director General, World Agroforestry (ICRAF) , Executive Director, CIFOR-ICRAF (05:00)

19:15-20:00

Join us for an informal facilitated networking session. Guided by conversational menus you will have the opportunity to connect with fellow conference participants in short breakout sessions of 10 minutes each. These sessions are limited to 1,000 participants, on a first come, first served basis.

GLF Biodiversity – Networking Menu Session 1

Patagonia

Takayna/Tarkine in northwestern Tasmania is home to one of the last tracts of old-growth rainforest in the world, yet it’s currently at the mercy of destructive extraction industries, including logging and mining. This documentary, presented by Patagonia Films, unpacks the complexities of modern conservation and challenges us to consider the importance of our last wild places.

Visit the digital exhibition booths, brought to you by leading environmental and grassroots organizations. Connect and learn with 25 booths, open 24/7. In Whova, under Exhibitions.

Bonn: UTC/GMT +1

28 October 2020

13:15-14:00
Global Landscapes Forum

The variety of life on Earth is being lost at an unprecedented rate. Now more than ever, the health of our planet requires us to recognize our complex, interdependent relationships with nature. During this opening plenary, keynote speakers will interact with the online community to frame the wicked problems of biodiversity loss alongside land degradation, climate change and the emergence of zoonotic pandemics. We kick off the conference with a call for a One Health approach, spotlighting the essential role of biodiversity and setting the scene for building back better.

  • Ashok Sridharan

    Mayor of Bonn, President of ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability

  • Jay Griffiths

    Award winning author, Advocate of nature

  • Elizabeth Mrema

    Executive Secretary , UN Convention on Biological Diversity

  • Shahid Naeem

    E3B Professor, Chair of the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology, Colombia University

  • Laura H. Kahn

    Physician and Research Scholar, Program on Science and Global Security at the Princeton University School of Public and International Affairs

  • Yolanda Kakabadse Navarro

    Former Minister of Environment for Ecuador

14:00-14:45
UN Environment Programme (UNEP)

This participatory plenary will be framed around the post-2020 global biodiversity framework, the Paris climate goals and the UN Decade of Ecosystem Restoration, all of which call on the global community to ‘bend the curve’ on these critical issues. Key global policy makers, scientists as well as business and community leaders will inform the audience about plans in place for the new decade, and engage in critical discussion. Through constructive debate, we will explore how the new policy frameworks can spark a vivid societal dialogue, consolidate next steps and pave the way for direct global action from individuals, civil society, local authorities and the global business community.

  • Musonda Mumba

    Chief, Terrestrial Ecosystems Unit (TEU), UN Environment

  • Sir Robert Watson

    Head of the scientific advisory group for the UNEP Global Assessments Synthesis Report

  • H.E. Fekadu Beyene Aleka

    Commissioner, Environment, Forest and Climate Change Commission of Ethiopia

  • Niria Alicia Garcia

    Indigenous leader and innovator, UN Young Champion of the Earth finalist

  • Johan Rockström

    Director of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research , Professor in Earth System Science at the University of Potsdam

19:30-20:15
Global Landscapes Forum

Agricultural supply chains are the leading driver of deforestation globally, contributing to the depletion of biodiversity and natural ecosystems. In this plenary, the audience will get an inside look at the interrelation between finance for biodiversity and sustainable land use and healthy landscapes and sustainable, inclusive value chains. A discussion among experts will place local communities at the heart of the discussion while exploring the innovative financial instruments that are needed to spark a bioeconomy, grounded in the rights and expertise of local communities.

20:15-21:00
Crop Trust

The session will envisage what the next steps should be for SDG 2.5 in the post-2020 Agenda. Where do we go from here? It will seek to demonstrate why agrobiodiversity is essential to ensure food and nutrition security for current and future global populations. The greater the diversity, the more resilient the system. Protecting crops and livestock from pests and disease, and ensuring they have improved resistance to increasing climatic shocks is essential. But how do we get there?

  • Danielle Nierenberg

    President and Co-Founder, Food Tank

  • Sir Peter Crane

    Board Chair and President, Oak Spring Garden Foundation

  • Marie Haga

    Associate Vice President for External Relations and Governance, IFAD

  • Kent Nnadozie

    Secretary, ITPGRFA (FAO)

  • Susan Bragdon

    Policy Advisor at Oxfam Novib, Sowing Diversity=Harvesting Sustainability Programme

  • Mildred Crawford

    Caribbean Network of Rural Women Producers, Farmers Co-Chair of the Executive Committee of the Global Assembly of Partners towards Habitat III (GAP)

  • Tina Claffey

    Award winning nature photographer

  • Pablo Vargas

    CEO , Britt

21:00-21:45

In Latin America, multiple drivers are putting pressure on biodiversity and natural ecosystems. This plenary will build on the issues raised in the ‘Financing Diversity’ plenary to shed light on opportunities and challenges to sustainable climate finance in the Amazon basin and the Latin American region at large. The debate will speak to financial innovations at the intersection of biodiversity and climate action and explore the initiatives and instruments needed to achieve a bio-economy that is truly based on nature’s richness, is gender–inclusive, and is grounded in the rights and expertise of Indigenous Peoples.

The two-part discussion will primarily be held in Portuguese and Spanish, with English translation.

  • Marina Campos

    Founder and Executive Director, Conexsus - US

  • Marianella Feoli

    Executive Director, Fundecooperacion for Sustainable Development

  • Elcio Machinery

    Coordinator, Coordination of the Indigenous Organizations of the Brazilian Amazon (COIAB)

In Latin America, multiple drivers are putting pressure on biodiversity and natural ecosystems. This plenary will build on the issues raised in the ‘Financing Diversity’ plenary to shed light on opportunities and challenges to sustainable climate finance in the Amazon basin and the Latin American region at large. The debate will speak to financial innovations at the intersection of biodiversity and climate action and explore the initiatives and instruments needed to achieve a bio-economy that is truly based on nature’s richness, is gender–inclusive, and is grounded in the rights and expertise of Indigenous Peoples.

The two-part discussion will primarily be held in Portuguese and Spanish, with English translation.

29 October 2020

14:30-15:15

While the world seems to get further entangled in a web of concurrent crises, there are a growing number of leaders and experts who are sparking new hope and trust in the future. GLF took the effort to find the experts sharing their visions on the state of biodiversity and gathered them in a single digital space to share their inspirational knowledge. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to listen in, learn and get inspired on why biodiversity is essential to building back better.

17:00-17:45
Nia Tero

Indigenous peoples are the time-immemorial guardians of many of the world’s remaining biodiversity-rich landscapes – and of the spirituality, values and worldviews embedded in these physical spaces. As human encroachments threaten Indigenous ways of life and connection to land, the world urgently needs to find ways to support this guardianship to help ensure the health of the planet and diversity of species. This interactive plenary will amplify the voices of Indigenous guardians, and will provide a platform for civil society groups, the private sector, policy-makers, local authorities and youth to discuss and explore processes that draw from Indigenous peoples and local communities’ knowledge to generate scalable solutions to contemporary challenges. These solutions will be rooted in reciprocity, will help to achieve human and ecological well-being, and will promote just and sustainable decision-making that restores harmony between people and nature.
Find this session’s white paper here.

17:45-19:10
Global Landscapes Forum

Two days of dialogue and debate will compel participants to get ready for a strong call to global action. But what action is most urgently needed? So many of us are pleading for transformative change – but what does this require? Experts will discuss the need for a fundamental, system-wide change across technological, economic and social factors, including changing paradigms, goals and values. To achieve this, we must move away from looking at biodiversity as a production factor to seeing it as an integral part of life, without which we cannot survive. Moving from an economy of exploitation to an economy of restoration will require individual and collective behavioural change.

The Closing Plenary will be opened by Elizabeth Mrema, Executive Secretary of the CBD and will start with a conversation between Christiane Paulus, Director General at BMU, Carla Montesi, Director at DEVCO and Carlos Rodriguez, CEO of GEF, before moving to a dynamic panel of representatives from youth, government, business, civil society and indigenous people.
Participants will join the discussion and contribute to the transformative change which we will initiate here.

  • Christiane Paulus

    Director General, Nature Conservation and Sustainable Use of Natural Resources, German Ministry for Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU)

  • Elizabeth Mrema

    Executive Secretary , UN Convention on Biological Diversity

  • Carla Montesi

    Director , European Commission’s Directorate General for Development and Cooperation

  • Carlos Manuel Rodriguez

    CEO and Chairperson, Global Environment Facility

  • Melina Sakiyama

    Co-Founder, Global Youth Biodiversity Network (GYBN)

  • Yvonne Aki Sawyerr

    Mayor of Freetown , Sierra Leone

  • Mwambu Wanendeya

    CEO and Founder, Carico

  • Peter Daszak

    President, EcoHealth Alliance

  • Benki Piyãko

    Ashaninka Community Leader, Terra Kampa do Rio Amônia

  • Robert Nasi

    Director General, Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), Managing Director, CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Rodrigo A. Medellin

    Senior Professor, Ecology and Biodiversity Department , Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

  • Khairani Barokka

    Writer, poet and artist, NYU Tisch Departmental Fellow

Bonn: UTC/GMT +1

28 October 2020

12:30-13:00
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

The 252nd edition of international forestry journal Unasylva, “Restoring the Earth: the next decade”, is devoted to building momentum for the restoration agenda to 2030, particularly in light of the opportunities presented by major restoration commitments such as the Bonn Challenge, the New York Declaration on Forests, AFR100, Initiative 20×20 and the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration 2021-2030.

14:45-14:50
Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) with World Agroforestry (ICRAF)

Join leaders of the Asian Forest Cooperation Organization (AFoCO), World Agroforestry and Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR-ICRAF), Global EverGreening Alliance (Alliance) for the signing of a landmark partnership agreement to restore drylands and drought-prone areas in Asia.

15:00-15:45
Global Biodiversity Outlook (GBO) with UN CBD

Global Biodiversity Outlook (GBO) is the flagship publication of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). GBO-5 provides global summary of progress towards the Aichi Biodiversity Targets and sets the scene for the development of the post 2020-global biodiversity framework. It is based on a range of indicators, research studies and assessments (in particular the IPBES Global Assessment on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services), as well as the national reports provided by countries on their implementation of the CBD. This Outlook draws on the lessons learned during the first two decades of this century to identify the transitions needed if we are to realize the vision agreed by world governments for 2050, ‘Living in Harmony with Nature’.

  • David Cooper

    Deputy Executive Secretary, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) , Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD)

29 October 2020

12:00-12:30
Global Landscapes Forum

Learn with forestry experts in Malawi, swim with Indigenous leaders in reef systems off the coast of Mexico and restore the Earth with young people in every landscape.

14:30-15:00
The Global EverGreening Alliance

More than ever, we are realizing how interconnected we are. Public health, biodiversity, and ecosystem restoration are interconnected. Biodiversity underpins life on Earth; it protects our health and wellbeing and it is up to us to restore it.

07:30-08:00
Young Professionals for Agricultural Development (YPARD) with Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

Agriculture is the main income source for most rural households in Asia and the Pacific region. However, the increasing biodiversity loss due to climate change represents a huge threat to people’s livelihoods, the consequences of which could be even more dangerous than the COVID-19 pandemic. To promote youth engagement in biodiversity protection toward achieving the UN 2030 Sustainable Development Goals, this Youth Daily Show – led by Young Professionals for Agricultural Development (YPARD) in collaboration with the Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) – will explore what young Indigenous people working in agriculture are doing to preserve biodiversity

12:30-13:00
Global Youth Biodiversity Network with Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

Years from now, historians will be discussing the reality we are living and the tomorrow we are defining. What will they call this age? The age of climate denial, the age of biodiversity loss or could it possible be the age of collective action? In a critical moment for the planet and all its peoples, the IPBES 2019 Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, suggest that we all get on the train of Transformative Change – a profound, fundamental, system-wide and strategic change in discourses, actions, values and policy. 

12:00-12:30
The International Forestry Students’ Association (IFSA) with Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

As we proceed through the 21st century and confront today’s biodiversity crisis, we on one hand realize how intertwined our well-being is with our biodiversity and ecosystem health, and on the other hand, we find ourselves immersed in a globalized urban cultural dimension detached from our roots.

  • Tisha Ramadhin

    Community Relations , Fairventures Worldwide FVW Indonesia

14:30-15:00
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

The Amazon, the Earth’s largest and most diverse rainforest, biodiversity hotspot and home to many indigenous communities, is on fire. The majority of these fires are not wildfires – they are ignited and can often be traced back to illegal forest clearing to create land for monocultures and support the increasing demand for commodities such as soy, coffee, cocoa and palm oil. Fires are just one of the impacts that monocultures have on the Amazons. During this Youth Daily Show, the Youth in Landscapes Initiative discusses with young experts from the Latin America Region the impacts of monocultures on the health of the local ecosystem and its biodiversity, as well as the health and food security of local communities.

Bonn: UTC/GMT +1

Facilitated networking sessions will connect you with people across the globe. Meet a new person every five minutes! The networking moderator will provide you with the information you can use to develop your questions, in order to make the most of your networking time.

Weekly interactive meetings

As part of the program, four weekly interactive sessions  will take place prior to the digital conference, each at around 14:00 CEST. 

During the sessions, participants will have the chance to share knowledge, expertise, and ideas. Through digital collaboration with peers; networking sessions; inspiring talks; and skills-based training sessions, participants will go on a journey of discovery about biocultural diversity in landscapes, climate action, biodiversity and finance, and nature-based solutions.

Participants who join at least three of the four interactive sessions will receive a free certificate of course completion, and free access to the GLF Biodiversity Digital Conference.

 

AGENDA

UTC/GMT +2
18 September
14:00
Welcome on board!
Our journey is finally beginning! During the first meeting, we will have a chance to get to know each other – and share our expectations for the learning journey – through facilitated networking activities. We will also provide a short introduction to the Global Landscapes Forum (GLF), Youth in Landscapes (YIL), and the Wageningen Centre for Development Innovation (CDI), as well as to the overall program.
 
22 September
14:00
Biocultural diversity in landscapes

Biological and cultural diversity are key features of all of our landscapes. Biodiversity contributes to our lives not only in practical, physical and functional ways, but also in cultural and spiritual ones. In this interactive meeting, we will explore some of the diversity in perspectives on, and relationships with, nature. We will consider the interlinkages between biological and cultural diversity within a professional context, and will also explore personal understandings and experiences of living in harmony with nature.

 
Tania Eulalia Martinez Cruz, Alisa Rai
29 September
14:00
Climate action in biodiverse landscapes

The second meeting is led by the Wageningen Centre for Development and Innovation (WCDI), as an introduction to the Massive Open Online Course (MOOC). The session will focus on climate change, climate action and biodiverse landscapes, and it will address the impact that climate change has on biodiversity, as well as the important role that biodiversity can play in tackling the climate crises.

 
6 October
14:00
Payments for ecosystem services (PES)

What does the world of money, investments and profit have to do with the world of bees, dolphins and mangroves? During the third meeting, we will consolidate and develop our learnings from the climate and finance MOOC module, by building a deeper understanding of the relationship between biodiversity and finance, and focusing specifically on the design of Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) schemes as an important skill for any land-use practitioner.

 
13 October
14:00
Nature-based solutions (NBS)

The world is looking for holistic and efficient ways to address multiple global challenges such as biodiversity loss, the climate crisis, food and water sovereignty, as well as preventing future global pandemics. During this meeting, led by Youth 4 Nature in collaboration with YIL and GLF, we will explore how and to what extent nature-based solutions (NBS) can be utilized for the benefit of our societies and the world’s biodiversity..

 

Volunteer

Develop yourself both personally and professionally: volunteer! In a world full of ego, values such as compassion, empathy, and the simple desire to dedicate hours for a common good are often left aside.

 

When you volunteer with GLF, you’ll work with fellow leaders to promote a message that’s essential for our time – and for the next generation. We’ll be counting on you and your skills to make sure it all shakes out in the best way possible.

YOUTH DELEGATIONS AND POLICY BRIEF

On the road to the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework, and in line with the United Nations General Assembly declaration for the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration (2021–2030), the Youth in Landscapes Initiative has invited youth organizations from all around the world to contribute to the Global Landscapes Forum Biodiversity Policy Brief. Through an intra- and inter-generational lens, this policy brief aims to bring into the global biodiversity agenda recommendations and action points for addressing the biodiversity crisis, based on knowledge co-created and shared during the GLF Biodiversity Digital Conference.

BIODIVERSITY: A DIGITAL JOURNEY

80 participants from 37 countries embarked on a digital journey four weeks before the GLF Biodiversity Digital Conference, following the new Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) “Climate action in biodiverse landscapes”, and attending weekly interactive learning sessions on a range of topics. Through digital collaboration with peers, networking sessions, inspiring talks and skills-based training sessions, participants went on a journey of discovery about biocultural diversity in landscapes, climate action, biodiversity and finance, and nature-based solutions.

Do you want to learn more about these topics too? Read the outcome of each session!