Agenda

Join us online on 2-3 June to share existing knowledge on drylands restoration and identify knowledge gaps. Learn what tools or practices are needed to effectively reverse our global history of ecosystem degradation, with its high cost for human livelihoods, climate resilience and regional political stability. Act to combat further deterioration, and bend the curve towards net positive restoration across Africa and beyond.

 

Bonn now:

Nairobi: UTC+03:00

Agenda

08:30-09:00
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) with Youth4Nature

Young people in Africa are increasingly interested in being a part of the restoration movement – either by leading restoration in their landscapes, or by joining an existing restoration project. But it’s not always easy to identify which activities to join, or how to start your own project. In this session, jointly organized by Youth 4 Nature (Y4N) and the Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL), we will explore how young people across Africa are getting involved in restoration; how they started their journeys; the challenges they have faced; and the solutions they have found. Two young African leaders at the forefront of landscape restoration will share with us their inspiring stories, and explain how drylands are landscapes of hope – for communities and for nature.

Read more: Youth Participation at GLF Africa Digital Conference: A Wave of Opportunities

  • Patience Onyeche Adaje

    PhD candidate in Environmental Economics and Management, University of Agriculture Makurdi Benue State, Nigeria

  • Olupot Joseph

    Assistant Director, Priceless Farms, YIL Alumni

08:30-09:15
Coalition of European Lobbies for Eastern African Pastoralism (CELEP)

The Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival seeks to deepen understanding of how diverse peoples sustain their livelihoods from extensive livestock production.
The relationships between pastoralist people, animals and their food production systems reflect an intimate intertwining of culture, economy and ecology in harsh environments, such as Africa’s drylands, where the mobility of animals plays a key role.
Films of multiple genres – spanning documentary, narrative and experimental – made by pastoralists and/or about pastoralists offer different insights into issues important to pastoralists.
This first session starts with an introductory animation film (CELEP 2021). Then, we will feature the film UnderMining Uganda (Karamoja Development Forum 2017), which shows the negative impacts upon pastoralists in the Karamoja region 20 years since the start of industrial mining. This film explores the reasons why the industry is far from contributing to socioeconomic gains in this largely pastoral region. Worse, it is contributing to massive land grabs that are undermining the livelihoods of pastoralists and other inhabitants of the area. To contextualize the film, Loupa Pius from DADO – the Dynamic Agro-pastoralist Development Organization (DADO) Kaabong – will share his experiences and insights and will answer audience questions. He is also co-chair of the regional group in Eastern & Southern Africa supporting the International Year of Rangelands & Pastoralists (www.iyrp.info) that has been put forward in the United Nations.
A second edition of the Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival will be launched in 2022. And you can be part of it! New films may now be submitted using the link(s) below:

https://filmfreeway.com/PerspectivesonPastoralismFilmFestival
http://www.pastoralistfilmfestival.com/
http://www.celep.info/

  • Loupa Pius

    Dynamic Agro-pastoralist Development Organization (DADO) Kaabong, Uganda and CELEP Member

Networking
Facilitated networking LIVE NOW
Global Landscapes Forum

Join us for an informal facilitated networking session. Guided by conversational menus, you will have the opportunity to connect with fellow conference participants in short breakout sessions. These sessions (in English and in French) are limited to 300 participants, on a first come, first served basis. Be sure to join the subsession in your preferred language.

Les sessions de réseautage vous mettront en relation avec des personnes du monde entier. Rencontrez une nouvelle personne toutes les cinq minutes ! Le modérateur vous fournira les informations que vous pourrez utiliser pour préparer vos questions afin de tirer le meilleur parti de votre temps de réseautage. Ces sessions (en anglais et en français) sont limitées à 300 participants, selon le principe du premier arrivé, premier servi. Vous auriez la possiblite de rejoindre la session dans langue de votre préférance. 

09:30-11:00
WWF

The session will introduce the new global Rangelands Atlas. To scale up dryland restoration and rehabilitation, science-based maps and data are essential. The Atlas includes a series of 16 sets of maps demonstrating how much of rangelands is key biodiversity or protected area, where threatened species are located, and what climate change impacts are predicted over the coming years. This is first of its kind of data. The maps show African countries that are at risk from climate change and where urgent action is required. Rangelands have rarely featured on international agendas. Just 10 per cent of national climate plans (as part of the Paris Climate Agreement) include references to rangelands; comparatively 70 per cent include references to forests. Although rangelands are known to play a key role in storing carbon, providing habitat for diverse wildlife and nature, and supporting the world’s largest rivers and wetlands, part of the reason they have been undervalued is the lack of definitive data on their extent and value. 54% per cent of the world’s terrestrial surface consists of rangelands, which are home to some of the earth’s most precious habitats and support the livelihoods of hundreds of millions of people. This new data can equip policymakers to better manage rangelands, with major benefits for pastoralists, nature, and climate. We will discuss how rangeland restoration and improvement of data on rangelands must be made priorities in UN conventions and the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, if drylands and dryland communities are to strengthen their resilience to climate change and other stresses and shocks.

For more information, visit the Rangelands Atlas website or download it directly here.

Read moreWhite Paper 

  • Abdelkader Bensada

    Programme Management Officer, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

  • Fiona Flintan

    Governance Scientist and Technical Coordinator, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

  • Jonathan Davies

    Global Drylands Coordinator / Senior Agriculture Advisor, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

  • Fernando García Dory

    Pastoralists Focal Point, Rangelands Initiative Co-ordination Team, Rangelands Initiative

  • Martina Fleckenstein

    Global Policy Manager, Food Practice, WWF International

  • Bora Masumbuko

    Senior Programme Officer, Drylands, IUCN

  • Gregorio Juan Velasco Gil

    Coordinator of the Pastoralist Knowledge Hub, FAO

  • Mordecai Ogada

    Executive Director, Conservation Solutions Afrika

TMG Research gGmbH

Building on practical cases from West, East, and Southern Africa, discussions in this session will explore community-led soil and land restoration that creates tangible benefits for communities and ecosystems by:

  • Providing insights on inclusive knowledge-sharing models that enhance access to context-specific data and practical toolkits on soil and land restoration
  • Highlighting community-led “social innovations” that help tackle structural barriers to equitable land rights and other governance challenges
  • Showcasing entry points for win-win restoration approaches that incentivize private investments in the sustainable management of shared natural resources

We hope that the discussions will develop practical insights for restoration pathways that simultaneously address social, technical, economic, and institutional barriers to the sustainable use of land, water, energy, and other natural resources.

Related publications:

Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the Context of National Food Security

From the Bottom Up: Investment Guide for creating an enabling environment for sustainable land management

Systemic Challenges, Systemic Responses. Innovating Adaptation to Climate Change through Agroecology

Creating an Enabling Environment for Land Degradation Neutrality and its Potential Contribution to Enhancing Well-being, Livelihoods and the Environment

Final Decision on Land Tenure

Related websites:

Regreening Africa: A collaborative initiative to scale-up evergreen agriculture, using locally appropriate techniques including Farmer-Managed Natural Regeneration.

Soilmates.org: A TMG Research project exploring social innovations to protect soils and empower people.

 

Read moreWhite Paper 

  • Patricia Kombo

    Founder, PaTree Initiative, Kenya

  • Lucy Mulenkei

    Executive Director, Indigenous Information Network (IIN)

  • Jes Weigelt

    Head of Programmes, TMG - Think Tank for Sustainability

  • Marcella D'Souza

    Founder and Director, Watershed Organisation Trust (WOTR) Centre for Resilience Studies, India

  • Leigh Winowiecki

    Soil Systems Scientist, Leader, Land Health Decisions, World Agroforestry (ICRAF)

  • Saydou Koudougou

    Executive Secretary, Groupe de Recherche et D'Action sur le Foncier (GRAF), Burkina Faso

  • Miriam Medel Garcia

    Chief, External Relations, Policy and Advocacy, UN Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)

  • Gautier Quéru

    Director, Land Degradation Neutrality Fund and Mirova

  • Wilson Ng'etich

    Deputy Vice-Chancellor, University of Eldoret

  • Mordecai Ogada

    Executive Director, Conservation Solutions Afrika

CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE)

The session will:

  • Provide evidence to inform restoration policy and practice and achieve the vision of the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration.
  • Synthesize factors affecting the success or failure of restoration initiatives, leading to recommendations for the design of new restoration initiatives.
  • Share lessons learned in terms of outcomes in the restoration impact pathway: 1) policies catalyzing change; 2) investments supporting change; 3) awareness of the need for change; 4) adoption of solutions; and 5) synergies and tradeoffs with other development outcomes.
  • Discuss the potential of existing scientific evidence, data, metrics, tools, methods and partnerships that CGIAR has generated as leveraging points for the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration.
  • Birhanu Zemadim Birhanu

    Senior Scientist and Project Leader, International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT)

  • Lulseged Tamene Desta

    Senior Soil Scientist, Biodiversity-CIAT

  • Ermias Betemariam

    Land Health Scientist , World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF)

  • Stefan Uhlenbrook

    Program Director, CGIAR Research Program on Water, Land and Ecosystems (WLE), IWMI

  • Marlène Elias

    Senior Scientist-Multifunctional Landscapes, Alliance and Gender Research Coordinator for the CGIAR Research Program on Forests, Trees and Agroforestry, Biodiversity-CIAT

  • Chris Dickens

    Principal Researcher Ecosystems, International Water Management Institute (IWMI)

  • Marcela Quintero

    Director, Multifunctional Landscape research area, Alliance of Bioversity International and the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT)

  • Natalia Estrada-Carmona

    Associate Scientist, Biodiversity-CIAT

  • Kalifa Traoré

    Scientific Director, Mali Agricultural Research Institute (IER)

  • Heizal Nagginda

    Climate and environmental activist, Founder, Climate Operation

  • Anthony Whitbread

    Research Program Director, Innovation Systems for the Drylands and Country Representative, Tanzania, ICRISAT

  • Mordecai Ogada

    Executive Director, Conservation Solutions Afrika

11:15-12:00
Global Landscapes Forum

This Opening Plenary will frame and define the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration through the African perspective. Join leading figures as they celebrate Africa’s drylands and lay out their vision for ecosystem restoration. A series of keynote speeches, interspersed by an inter-generational dialogue, will be followed by a discussion with experts who will reflect on how ecosystem restoration can be achieved from the ground up.

  • Inger Andersen

    Under-Secretary-General, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

  • Maria Flachsbarth

    Parliamentary State Secretary, German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ)

  • Ibrahim Thiaw

    Executive Secretary, United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)

  • John Kamanga

    Director, South Rift Association of Land Owners (SORALO)

  • Agnes Kalibata

    President, UN Special Envoy, The Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), 2021 Food Systems Summit

  • Ndidi Okonkwo Nwuneli

    Managing Partner, Sahel Consulting

  • Akinwumi A. Adesina

    President, African Development Bank Group

  • Wanjira Mathai

    Vice President and Regional Director for Africa, World Resources Institute (WRI)

12:00-12:45
Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR) with World Agroforestry (ICRAF), Youth and Small Holder Farmers (YOSHOFA), Nigerian Women Agro Allied Farmers Association (NIWAAFA)

This plenary will showcase successful restoration practices and the women and men that are practicing them in the drylands. The plenary will illustrate a suite of restoration practices applied across heterogenous contexts in a participatory manner with involvement of women, men, youth and their respective organizations.

Stories will be heard from Kenya, Ethiopia, Senegal, Ghana, Mali, Nigeria and Niger. Approaches to building grassroots movements will be highlighted; scaling and deepening learnings on restoration from farmer/household decision making all the way to local institution formation in leading local movements via faith-based groups, farmer cooperatives, women saving groups and community based organizations.

13:00-13:45
The International Livestock Research Institute

Take a virtual trip to the great savanna lands of East Africa—cradle of humankind, home to traditional nomadic pastoralists, and last refuge of some of the most spectacular wildlife populations on earth.

Join experts from the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) including rangelands specialist Fiona Flintan, ecosystem ecologist Jason Sircely and gender scientist Renee Bullock to hear some ‘myth-busting’ facts about East Africa’s extraordinary drylands and dryland peoples, to discover why Africa’s rangelands are now in big transition, and to learn how we can best support local pastoral communities to continue their stewardship of these exceptional landscapes as they continually refine their adaptations to a changing physical, political and socio-economic climate.

Hear directly from East African pastoralists as they explain some of the major challenges they face. As agricultural ecologist Ian Scoones reminds us: ‘As we confront uncertainties in today’s complex and turbulent world, we could all learn from pastoralists, who continue to navigate uncertainties with deep knowledge and practised skill.’

  • Fiona Flintan

    Governance Scientist and Technical Coordinator, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

  • Jason Sircely

    Ecosystem Ecologist, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

  • Mary Letirok

    Samburu herder

  • Renee Bullock

    Gender and environment scientist, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

  • Dickson Ole Kaelo

    Wildlife Management Expert and the founding Chief Executive Officer, Kenya Wildlife Conservancies Association (KWCA)

Crop Trust

The focus of this GLF launchpad event is to highlight the critical importance of genebanks in Africa, their role in ensuring food security, and the challenges they currently face. COVID-19 has exposed how vulnerable and interconnected we are. Without international cooperation, effective safeguarding of plant genetic resources to secure the world’s food supply is simply not possible.

Genebanks are full of untapped potential in the incredible wealth of crop diversity they hold, and many are unable to live up to their promise due to an array of challenges, including being under-resourced. By making seeds available to breeders and farmers to develop and use crop varieties adapted to current and future climates, genebanks are fundamental in combatting the effects of climate change and are of critical importance for sustainable farming and the livelihoods of smallholder farmers. Using crop varieties that are nutrient-rich, tolerant to environmental stresses like drought and extreme heat, and are resistant to pests and diseases helps smallholder farmers to ensure their food security while putting less pressure on fragile ecosystems. And these varieties are essential factors in securing future food and nutrition across the continent.

  • Stefan Schmitz

    Executive Director, The Global Crop Diversity Trust

  • Éliane Ubalijoro

    Executive Board Member, The Global Crop Diversity Trust

  • Damaris Achieng Odeny

    Global Cluster Leader, Genomics, Pre-breeding and Bioinformatics, ICRISAT

  • Susan Bragdon

    Policy Advisor, Oxfam Novib

  • Tony Simons

    Director General, World Agroforestry (ICRAF) , Executive Director, CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Agnes Kalibata

    President, UN Special Envoy, The Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), 2021 Food Systems Summit

13:00-13:30
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) with The African Youth Initiative on Climate Change (AYICC)

The Youth population in Africa is projected to reach 1.2 billion by 2030. But lack of job opportunities, under-employment or challenging work conditions might increasingly become problematic as the number of young people increases. This Youth Daily Show, jointly organized by the African Youth Initiative on Climate Change and the Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL), will explore the topic of youth unemployment in Africa and how dryland’s restoration, and more in general the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, can play a role in increasing employment opportunities for regional youth. Two young African leaders will share with us their perspectives and stories and together we will explore how the restoration of drylands can bring hope, for communities and for nature.

Read more: Youth Participation at GLF Africa Digital Conference: A Wave of Opportunities

  • Helina Teklu

    Co-founder , Climate Change Africa and Seed Bomb Ethiopia

  • Desmond Alugnoa

    Co-founder, Green Africa Youth Organization (GAYO)

14:00-15:30
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ)

Biochar has been widely reported to improve soil fertility, crop yields and to store sequestered carbon in soils. Furthermore, biochar producing ovens can be used for cooking at household level, which uses biomass much more efficiently than traditional fire cooking places. Therefore, biochar has the potential to contribute to restoration of degraded lands from two angles, by reducing pressure on woodlands as sources for fuel and by improving soil fertility. This session will reflect these aspects through case studies and will present lessons learned from successful interventions and obstacles on the way to promote biochar.

Read moreWhite Paper 

Crop Trust

The session will explore the power of crop diversity through two lenses: the scientific lens and the gastronomic lens. Two panels will include experts working on resilient, drought-resistant crops on the African continent, as well as under-utilized crops, tropical forages, and food trees with potential to restore drylands (predominantly in the Sahel). The session will also include chefs and entrepreneurs harnessing the potential of these crops to promote more delicious, nutritious, and climate-friendly options around food. In the first panel, the experts will look into key crops and food trees that present an astounding potential to tackle the main challenges associated with climate change and land degradation in the region, and will explore ways to foster greater conservation and sustainable use of these crops to enhance breeding programs and farmers’ livelihoods. The second panel will gather organizations and individuals working on the ground to create nature-based solutions around agrobiodiversity and sustainable agriculture in Africa’s drylands.

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

The GEF-7 Drylands Sustainable Landscapes Impact Program (DSL IP) aims at transforming the management of drylands in 11 countries across three geographical clusters; 1) the Miombo and Mopane ecosystems of Southern Africa, 2) the savanna and grasslands in East and West Africa and, 3) the temperate grasslands, savannas and shrublands of Central Asia.

This session will bring partners and stakeholders from different sectors and scales (local, national, regional and global) together to share their respective perspectives on the dryland management challenges in the target regions and to discuss how the DSL IP’s programmatic approach will support them in overcoming these challenges.

Read moreWhite Paper 

  • H.E. Nancy Tembo

    Minister of Forestry and Natural Resources of the Republic of Malawi

  • Ulrich Apel

    Senior Environmental Specialist, Global Environment Facility

  • Jonathan Davies

    Global Drylands Coordinator / Senior Agriculture Advisor, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

  • Barron Joseph Orr

    Lead Scientist , United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)

  • Maria Helena Semedo

    Deputy Director-General, Climate and Natural Resources, FAO

  • Gustavo Fonseca

    Director of Programs, Global Environment Facility (GEF)

  • Mette Løyche Wilkie

    Director, Forestry Division, FAO

  • Eduardo Mansur

    Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment, FAO

  • Ezekiel Mwakalukwa

    Chairperson, Committee on Forestry Working Group on Dryland Forests and Agrosilvopastoral Systems

  • Sibongile Winnie Mavimbela

    Senior Programme Officer, Environment and Climate Change at Southern African Development Community (SADC)

  • Nicole Harari

    Research Scientist, Centre for Development and Environment (CDE), University of Bern

  • Fritjof Boerstler

    Technical Advisor (Natural Resources), GEF Coordination Unit, Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment, FAO

  • Frank Musukwa

    Chairperson, Zambia National Forest Commodity Association (ZNFCA)

  • Pierre Thiam

    Chef, Founder, Yolele Foods

15:45-16:30
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

L’édition française de la revue internationale des forêts et des industries forestières, Unasylva, «Restaurer la Terre – la décennie à venir» sera lancée à GLF Afrique. La revue se consacre à la création d’une dynamique pour le programme de restauration à l’horizon 2030, en particulier vu les opportunités qu’offrent les principaux engagements de restauration tels que le Défi de Bonn (Bonn Challenge), la Déclaration de New York sur les forêts, l’AFR100, l’Initiative 20 × 20 et la La Décennie des Nations unies pour la restauration des écosystèmes 2021-2030.

Le journal Unasylva, créé en 1947, est le plus ancien périodique de la FAO. Il vise à informer une large gamme de lecteurs sur d’importants développements mondiaux dans le domaine de la foresterie et met en avant une diversité d’auteurs venant de partout sur la planète et d’un éventail de secteurs et d’institutions.

Lors du lancement d’Unasylva 252, des panélistes de la société civile, d’organisations internationales et de gouvernements nationaux vont partager sur le processus participatif qui a conduit à la création de l’édition; souligner les conclusions importantes de l’édition; sensibiliser aux opportunités associées à la restauration et à la Décennie des Nations Unies; et souligner le dynamisme des efforts de restauration au niveau mondial.

Restoring the Earth – The next decade

The French edition of the international forestry journal Unasylva, “Restoring the Earth – The next decade” is being launched at GLF Africa. The journal is devoted to building momentum for the restoration agenda to 2030, particularly in light of the opportunities presented by major restoration commitments such as the Bonn Challenge, the New York Declaration on Forests, AFR100, Initiative 20×20 and the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration 2021-2030.

The Unasylva journal, established in 1947, is the UN FAO’s longest-running periodical. It aims to bring globally-significant developments in forestry to a broad range of readers, and features contributors from across the planet and from a range of sectors and institutions.

At the launch of Unasylva 252, panelists from civil society, international organizations and national governments will share stories of the participatory process that lead to the edition’s creation; highlight important findings of the edition; raise awareness around the opportunities associated with restoration and the UN Decade; and emphasize the vibrancy of restoration efforts at the global level.

This launchpad will be in French with English translation.

  • Mamadou Moussa Diakhité

    Senior Manager of the Sustainable Land and Water Management, NEPAD

  • Christophe Besacier

    Senior Forestry Officer, Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism Forestry Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Julien Noël Rakotoarisoa

    Director General of Environmental Governance, Ministry of Environment and Sustainable Development, Madagascar

  • Habiba Khiari

    Administrateur de programme adjoint, Programme de Neutralité en matière de Dégradation des Terres (NDT) du Mécanisme Mondial de la Convention des Nations Unies sur la Lutte Contre la Désertification (UNCCD)

  • Issa Garba

    Chef de la Division Maitrise, l'Eau Lutte contre la Désertification (ME-LCD) du Centre Régional AGRHYMET( CRA)

  • Tiina Vähänen

    Deputy Director, Forestry Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Fatoumata Diawara

    Malian singer-song writer / actress

Supporting Pastoralism and Agriculture in Recurrent and Protracted Crisis (SPARC) with Global Landscapes Forum

Innovation, at its core, is about doing business differently. Innovation might include products, services, processes, business models, and technologies; creating value primarily through social impact as well as commercial gains. Yet not all innovations work, and not all innovations that work do so at scale especially in the arid-to-semi-arid lands and fragile and conflict-affected areas. The goals of this session is to present the landscape of innovations in drylands and conflict-affected countries in the Horn of Africa and the Sahel; benchmark success factors for innovations to have impact; as well as discuss opportunities and challenges of sustainably scaling innovations.

Read moreWhite Paper 

  • Christabell Makokha

    Senior Innovation Advisor, Supporting Pastoralism and Agriculture in Recurrent and Protracted Crises (SPARC)

  • Jerioth Mwaura

    Technology for Development Advisor, Mercy Corps

  • Carmen Jaquez

    Economies & Livelihoods Thematic Working Group Lead, SPARC

  • Hassan Bashir

    Executive Director, Agency for Inclusive Insurance Development (AIID)

  • Ken Lohento

    Digital Innovation Strategy Specialist (Consultant), Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO, Regional Office for Africa)

  • Catherine Le Côme

    Global Technical Advisor Livestock, SNV

  • Rupsha Banerjee

    Social Scientist - Institutions and Innovation, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

  • Fatoumata Diawara

    Malian singer-song writer / actress

Groundswell International

This session provides an overview of the practical experience, techniques, and results of an “evergreening” approach to dryland restoration in the Sahel. A particular focus is given to Farmer Managed Natural regeneration (agroforestry), but within a more integrated approach, including soil and water conservation. A short video provides testimonies by women and men farmers in villages. The session concludes with messages to financial donors about the lessons learned for scaling out land restoration drawn from experiences in Senegal, Mali and Burkina Faso.

  • Peter Gubbels

    Director for Action Learning and Advocacy for West Africa, Groundswell International

  • Fatoumata Batta

    Board member, Association Nourrir Sans Détruire, Burkina Faso

  • Tsuamba Bourgou

    Regional Coordinator, West Africa, Groundswell International

  • Fatoumata Diawara

    Malian singer-song writer / actress

16:45-18:15
International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO)

This session will share fundamental practices and skills needed by different actors to support progress in forest landscape restoration (FLR) on the ground. Those include: (i) sensitizing policymakers to the right mix of regulations and policies that need to be in place for local actors to successfully restore land, and for moving towards sustainable land management practices; (ii) preparing FLR facilitators to assist stakeholders in organizing the platforms for interaction, reconciling conflicting views, and planning FLR activities, as well as gathering information, linking actors and monitoring progress; and (iii) co-developing FLR and improvement measures with local actors.

Read moreWhite Paper 

  • Vianny Ahimbisibwe

    Research Scientist, Thünen Institute of International Forestry and Forest Economics

  • Stephanie Mansourian

    Environmental consultant, University of Geneva

  • Steve Makungwa

    Senior lecturer, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources

  • Appolinaire Razafimahatratra

    Coordinator of the networks of communities managing natural resources, WWF Madagascar

  • Ida Nadia Djenontin

    Social Scientist, PhD Candidate, Department of Geography, Environment, and Spatial Sciences, Environmental Science & Policy Program (ESPP), Michigan State University

World Bank Group

The Dedicated Grant Mechanism (DGM) is a global initiative that supports the participation of Indigenous Peoples and Local Communities (IPLCs) in the international effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) and promote sustainable forest management. Although still a relatively new initiative, it is showing promise as a new model for building capacity and broadening engagement with IPLCs. A broad range of stakeholders – including forest-dependent communities, DGM practitioners, donors, multilateral development banks, and climate funds – have expressed a strong interest in both the DGM-specific and the universal lessons that are being captured.

  • Maria Sarraf

    Practice Manager, World Bank

  • Okyeame Kwame

    Musician and climate change activist

  • Johnson Cerda

    DGM Global Technical Director, Conservation International

  • Kapupu Diwa Mutimanwa

    DGM Global Steering Committee member, President, League of Indigenous Pygmy Associations of Congo (LINAPYCO)

  • Garo Batmanian

    Global Lead for Forests, Landscapes, and Biodiversity, ENB GP, World Bank

  • Diallo Kadydja

    President, Allah Wallou, Burkina Faso

18:30-19:15
WWF

This plenary will set the foundation for aligning the UN Decade on Ecosystems Restoration and the UN Food Systems Summit. Restoration and rehabilitation of degraded land is one of the focal areas for Action Track 3 “Boosting nature positive production”. Bringing together decision makers from African countries, farmers, scientists, civil society and donors, the plenary will discuss synergies and deliver joint action for African Dryland Restoration. With key partners, the plenary will explore linking the UN Food Systems Summit’s game-changing solutions on restoration with the targets of the UN Decade, identifying communalities and opportunities for collaboration, and strengthening the importance of restoration in the context of food security for Africa’s drylands.

19:15-20:00
Supporting Pastoralism and Agriculture in Recurrent and Protracted Crisis (SPARC) with Global Landscapes Forum

Protracted crises are persistent in Africa’s drylands. Weak governance, insecure land rights and access, environmental fragility and armed conflict impact the lives of millions of pastoralists, agro-pastoralists and farmers in drylands across Africa; climate change is starting to layer on additional stress. SPARC research with pastoral and agro-pastoral communities across the Sahel and Horn of Africa reveals how they are responding to multiple pressures and adapting their livelihoods. Innovations emerging from these regions are also providing solutions to some of their most critical challenges. In this plenary, we will discuss some of the opportunities and challenges when taking a more integrated approach to addressing ecosystem restoration in drylands facing recurrent and protracted crises.

Contact SPARC directly for more information: enquiries@sparc-knowledge.org 

Learn more about SPARC: https://www.sparc-knowledge.org/ 

Share innovations with SPARC:  https://forms.gle/Suhi9KojGgEs7zsNA

  • Musonda Mumba

    Director , Rome Centre for Sustainable Development Nature, Climate and Energy

  • Christabell Makokha

    Senior Innovation Advisor, Supporting Pastoralism and Agriculture in Recurrent and Protracted Crises (SPARC)

  • Fiona Flintan

    Governance Scientist and Technical Coordinator, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

  • Charity Lanoi

    Restoration Steward, Moilo Grass Seed Bank

20:15-21:00
Coalition of European Lobbies for Eastern African Pastoralism (CELEP)

The Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival seeks to deepen understanding of how diverse peoples sustain their livelihoods from extensive livestock production.

The relationships between pastoralist people, animals and their food production systems reflect an intimate intertwining of culture, economy and ecology in harsh environments, such as Africa’s drylands, where the mobility of animals plays a key role.

Films of multiple genres – spanning documentary, narrative and experimental – made by pastoralists and/or about pastoralists offer different insights into issues important to pastoralists.

This second session begins with an introductory animation film (CELEP 2021) and then focuses on pastoralist livelihoods in Africa through two films made in Niger. The first is a documentary, Waynaabe: Life scenes of the Wodaabe breeders (Francesco Sincich 2012), which shows the life of nomadic Wodaabe livestock keepers through the eyes of the young mother Mooro. Her unmarried niece, Mariama, explains the worso, a ceremonial gathering of their clan in Akadaney. The film highlights how the Wodaabe value their cattle and deal with the challenges of securing a livelihood in the drylands of Niger. It was commissioned by Vétérinaires Sans Frontières (VSF) Belgium to show the setting of their work on animal health.

The next film is a short, Ngaynaaka: Herding chaos (Saverio Krätli 2017), which focuses on how pastoralists thrive on nature’s variability. As the environment becomes more unpredictable, people all over the world face higher costs in an effort to sustain the usual strategies aimed at controlling it. The Wodaabe pastoralists show that there is another way.

Dr. Saverio Krätli, an honorary editor of the journal Nomadic Peoples, is an anthropologist specializing in pastoral systems. Saverio has worked extensively across sub-Saharan Africa. Among his many publications, he wrote the Pastoral Development Orientation Framework in 2019. Saverio will share insights from his experience working on Ngaynaaka: Herding chaos, and will offer an audience Q&A.
A second edition of the Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival will be launched in 2022. And you can be part of it! New films may now be submitted using the link(s) below:
https://filmfreeway.com/PerspectivesonPastoralismFilmFestival
http://www.pastoralistfilmfestival.com/
http://www.celep.info/

Nairobi: UTC+03:00

Agenda

08:00-08:30
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) with Dynamic Youth for Land (Yilaa)

Women in Africa’s drylands could be likened to superheroes: they take care of the kids and the land, and ensure income for their families. And, as if this was not enough, they are an incredible source of knowledge on traditional practices, sustainable land management and innovations for resilience and survival during periods of drought. During this Youth Daily Show, we will present an intergenerational conversation between two women, exploring their roles in their communities, and understanding the importance of handing down knowledge from generation to generation.

Read more: Youth Participation at GLF Africa Digital Conference: A Wave of Opportunities

08:45-10:15
New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) with Justdiggit

Join us for an exclusive screening of a brand-new documentary featuring some of Africa’s restoration champions, AFR100 Presents: The Grand African Green Up. From Ghana to Kenya, Tanzania, and Madagascar, follow narrator Wanjira Mathai for a narrative journey through a few of Africa’s regenerating landscapes. The Grand African Green Up is co-produced by AUDA-NEPAD and Justdiggit, with support from World Resources Institute.

  • Wanjira Mathai

    Vice President and Regional Director for Africa, World Resources Institute (WRI)

09:30-10:00
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

As we enter a decade dedicated to ecosystem restoration, it is crucial to center the knowledge, interests and needs of the people that are stewarding the world’s remaining biodiversity: Indigenous peoples and local communities. During this special Youth Daily Show, Adjany Costa, a young marine biologist and ethno-conservationist from Angola, who also served as the youngest Minister of Culture, Tourism and Environment in Angola’s history, will share her own experience with community-led conservation as well as her perspective on setting robust foundations for a restoration movement that includes traditional ecological knowledge and scientific knowledge.

  • Hon. Adjany Costa

    Advisor for Environmental Affairs, President of the Republic of Angola

10:30-11:15
Global Landscapes Forum

Land is soil, land is food, land is life. Women’s, youths’ and pastoralists’ livelihoods and income often depend on it, but limited availability of communal land and challenges to formal ownership are increasingly creating tension between herders, farmers and investors. While formal land security in Africa is increasing, the number of land disputes is also on the rise, with women and youth often on the losing end. This plenary represents an intergenerational conversation among farmers, pastoralists, youth and elders, who will share their challenges and collectively explore solutions

  • Elizabeth Mpofu

    Founding member, General Coordinator, African Women Collaborative for Healthy Food Systems, Via Campesina

  • Diana Kyalo

    Founder and writer, Landpages

  • Amina Aden Maalim

    Research scientist, Kenya Forestry Research Institute (KEFRI)

  • Check Abdel Kader Baba

    Research associate country program manager, TMG Research

11:15-12:00
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) with German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU)

Degraded landscapes threaten the livelihood of the majority of rural populations. In years of implementing landscape restoration activities, it has become clear that embedding the interventions in the local communities is essential to the sustainability and success of such initiatives. A comprehensive participation of local stakeholders in the planning and implementation processes have a great potential to empower local structures and communities, especially women and youth, and become an irreplaceable core of ecosystem restoration.

GIZ and partners from its Forests4Future and Large-scale Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR) in Africa programme will showcase how initiatives such as the AFR100 and international FLR programs for restoring degraded landscapes must use this potential!

Read moreWhite Paper 

  • Tony Rinaudo

    Principal Natural Resources Advisor, World Vision Australia

  • Mamadou Moussa Diakhité

    Team leader of AUDA-NEPAD and Executive Secretary of the AFR100 Secretariat

  • Tabi Joda

    Executive Director, GreenAid

  • Charles Karangwa

    Regional Lead- Forests, Landscapes and Livelihoods Programme; Country Representative for Rwanda, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

  • Joséphine Makueti

    Senior Expert for Landscape Restoration, Associated Researcher, Forest and Environment Programme at German Cooperation (GIZ), CIRAD

12:15-13:45
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) with Global Landscapes Forum, International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO)

Get an inside look at the results of the African capacity needs assessment undertaken by the UN FAO-led taskforce on best practices. This session will raise awareness of the existing systemic capacities for restoration as well as the current gaps and barriers, and of the opportunities to meet these needs in the context of the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration.

The session will highlight pathways towards enhancing practitioners’ capacities through the development or up-scaling of key knowledge products and various capacity development initiatives, such as the Landscape Academy, the FAO-ELTI youth contest, and the Restoration Factory.

  • Tiina Vähänen

    Deputy Director, Forestry Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Christophe Besacier

    Senior Forestry Officer, Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism Forestry Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Faustine Zoveda

    Forestry Officer, Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism Forestry Division , Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Robin Chazdon

    Research and Consultant, Forestoration International

  • Adejoke Olukemi Akinyele

    Reader, Department of Forest Production and Products, University of Ibadan

  • Esther Ekua Amoako

    Lecturer, Faculty of Natural Resource and Environment, University for Development Studies, Tamale Ghana/PhD student at Rhodes University, South Africa

  • Patrick P. Kalas

    Natural Resources Officer (Capacity, Institutional Development and Governance), Office for Climate, Biodiversity and Environment (OCB), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Jesca Jepkosgei Kiplagat

    Community of Practice Coordinator, Africa Chapter Manager, GLFx

  • Moussa Maïhatchi Chipkao

    Alumni of the Restoration Factory, PDG Centre Africain d’Agrobusiness (CAAB)

  • Estelle Manuela Nganlo Keguep

    Forest environmentalist, ELTI alumni

  • Cora van Oosten

    Senior Project Leader, Wageningen Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen University

  • Steve Makungwa

    Senior lecturer, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources

12:15-13:00
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) with World Vision

The world has experienced severe land degradation due to deforestation, climate change, drought, desertification and unsustainable land uses. Consequently, the productivity and health of farmlands, grazing lands and forests is damaged, which in turn harms the individuals and communities who depend on these resources for their food supply, health and income. As a result, many rural populations in the developing world suffer from malnutrition, loss of opportunity, increased vulnerability and poverty. Migration increases as workers move away to earn a living, which can also lead to family fragmentation and increased potential for conflict. This is not a safe or sustainable future for rural communities. Nor does it help the growth of nations reliant on primary industries, such as agriculture.

But this is changing. Communities across the world are transforming their lives and reshaping their lands through a low-cost, simple and sustainable land regeneration practice called Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR). Through FMNR and their own efforts, communities can restore degraded lands to productivity relatively quickly and efficiently. FMNR has proven its potential in mobilizing and empowering local communities to restore their natural environment and consequently building resilience – of people, their lands and their livelihoods.
Join Tony Rinaudo (World Vision Senior Climate Action Advisor, pioneer of FMNR and Right Livelihood Award Laureate, 2018) and Irene Ojuok (Right Livelihood College PhD student at the Center for Development Research (ZEF) and Global Evergreening Ambassador) as they speak on the FMNR approach from a global and Kenyan perspective.

Read moreWhite Paper 

  • Tony Rinaudo

    Principal Natural Resources Advisor, World Vision Australia

  • Irene Ojuok

    Environmentalist, Junior Researcher, Center for Research and Development ZEF - University of Bonn

13:00-13:45
Coalition of European Lobbies for Eastern African Pastoralism (CELEP)

The Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival seeks to deepen understanding of how diverse peoples gain their livelihoods from extensive livestock production.

The relationships of pastoralist people and animals and their food production systems reflect an intimate intertwining of culture, economy and ecology in harsh environments such as Africa’s drylands. In such environments, mobility of animals plays a key role.

Films of multiple genres – spanning documentary, narrative and experimental – made by pastoralists and/or about pastoralists offer different insights into issues important to pastoralists.

This third session confronts political and economic injustices with the theme, ‘Speaking truth to power: pastoralists’ advocacy’. Nick Lunch, from Insight Share in the UK will share a few words about participatory video and the making of Olosho. After a short animation film introducing pastoralism (CELEP, 2021), there is a short film featuring Shoba Liban, Program Manager of the Pastoralist Women Health and Education non-profit organization based in Isiolo, Kenya (CELEP, 2019).

Land grabbing in pastoralist areas is unmasked through two films in this session. Olosho (2015) is a participatory video (PV) made by 6 community members in Loliondo from 5 Maasai clans in northern Tanzania, created with facilitation from InsightShare. In 1992, a hunting company from the United Arab Emirates occupied 1500 km2 of village land in Loliondo to set up a private game reserve beside the Serengeti National Park. Since then, Maasai have been denied access to vital pasture and waterpoints for their herds. The people suffered mass eviction from their villages within the disputed land. The PV training strengthened the Maasai’s self-advocacy to resist land-grabbing by foreign investors.

The last film in this session is an advocacy film, Lower Omo: local tribes under threat (2012). The filmmaker chooses to remain anonymous out of safety concerns. The think-tank, Oakland Institute, shares this film to reveal the situation of agropastoralists in the Lower Omo Valley in Southern Ethiopia, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is home to about 200,000 people from several ethnic groups, e.g. the Bode, Dassenach, Hamer, Karo, Kwegu, Mursi, Nyangatom and Suri. Most of them raise livestock where the annual flooding of the Omo River replenishes grazing areas and practise flood-retreat cropping on the riverbanks. Their cattle are a source of food, wealth and pride, and are intimately tied to their cultural identity. The lives and culture of these peoples are threatened by the construction of the Gibe III dam.

The themes presented will be elaborated further by Dr. Christina (Echi) Gabbert from the Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology at Göttingen University, Germany, who can also answer questions from the audience. She has collaborated in southern Ethiopia with pastoralists over the last twenty years. Among her many publications, she is one of the editors of the book, Lands of the Future: Anthropological Perspectives on Pastoralism, Land Deals and Tropes of Modernity.

A second edition of the Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival will be launched in 2022. And you can be part of it! New films may now be submitted using the link below:
https://filmfreeway.com/PerspectivesonPastoralismFilmFestival
http://www.pastoralistfilmfestival.com/
http://www.celep.info/

13:00-13:30
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) with The International Forestry Students’ Association (IFSA), Young Professionals for Agricultural Development (YPARD)

On the one hand, we have drylands. They constitute 60% of the surface of the African continent, and while some might think they do not have much agricultural potential, they can actually sustain thriving agricultural practices, including – but not limited to – agroforestry systems.

On the other hand, we have youth. Young people are dynamic and innovative; have a high uptake of technological know-how; and are passionate, perseverant, and most of all, courageous.

During this Youth Daily Show, we want to explore the opportunities that agroforestry can bring to Africa’s drylands – not only as a sustainable food system, but also as an opportunity for youth employment and the achievement of food security for present and future generations. We will hear from amazing young professionals from across the African continent, who will share their experience with, and innovations for, dryland agroforestry.

Read more: Youth Participation at GLF Africa Digital Conference: A Wave of Opportunities

14:00-15:30
World Resources Institute (WRI)

It’s hard to see where people are restoring Africa’s drylands. Where trees are growing outside of tropical forests, it’s hard for satellites to pick them up and harder to measure their economic and social benefits. It’s even harder to show progress when restoration doesn’t involve trees. In this session, you will learn directly about these challenges and opportunities from people actively restoring drylands. Together, we will unpack the what, the why, and the how of monitoring restoration in drylands — and show how tracking progress can lead to more investment and healthier communities. Join World Resources Institute for this exciting and interactive conversation.

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU)

We are at a critical crossroads in human history. We can continue on the path that has led to degradation of ecosystems, climate change, poverty, and inequality or we can reverse those trends and create new, regenerative, inclusive, and efficient systems of living and doing business. We propose that the urgent need for housing be met by modern, engineered wood buildings and that the demand for wood be leveraged to drive restorative management of degraded dry tropical forests. Restorative forest management becomes possible through a new and integrated tropical timber industry based on local control and entrepreneurship.

Read moreWhite Paper 

World Bank

Tropical dry forests are subject to some of the highest rates of deforestation and degradation around the world, even though they cover some 2.7 million square kilometers in Africa alone and represent globally important carbon storage. These ecosystems are particularly at risk due their fragility and the high demand for forest goods and services, which are required to support the livelihoods of large numbers of the world’s poorest people. Despite their importance, little is known about dry forests and they are often not covered by inventories and management planning.

Recent major breakthroughs in satellite Earth Observation (EO) data provision provide unprecedented views of the Earth and present an opportunity to address existing limitations in forest monitoring capabilities. In 2014 and 2015, the European Space Agency (ESA) launched two satellite missions – Sentinel-1 and Sentinel-2 – to improve monitoring the global environment. Both satellites are revolutionary in terms of wide coverage, high spatial resolution, and frequent repeat coverage. Similar to the Landsat-8 mission, data collected by the Sentinel satellites are provided through an open access policy. These missions and open access policies have dramatically increased available data on global forests.

The session will focus on introducing the new and innovative tools developed by the Satellite Monitoring for Forest Management (SMFM) project by the World Bank in 2017–2020. The SMFM project developed tools to allow forest practitioners to use these new satellite resources for forest cover and biomass assessment, dense time-series change analysis and analyzing the drivers of forest change.

Read moreWhite Paper

  • Idah Z. Pswarayi-Riddihough

    Country Director, Mozambique, Madagascar, Mauritius, Comoros and Seychelles, Eastern and Southern Africa, Africa, The World Bank

  • Tuukka Castrén

    Senior Forestry Specialist, The World Bank

  • Phoebe Oduor

    GHG/SLEEK Project Manager, Regional Centre for Mapping of Resources for Development

  • Sam Bowers

    Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Edinburgh

  • Aristides Muhate

    MRV Coordinator, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Mozambique

15:45-17:15
International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

Rangelands occupy one-third of all land on earth, are home to important biodiversity, support more than 2 billion people and significantly contribute to the SDGs. Despite their importance, rangelands continue to be characterized by chronic underinvestment and high degradation. This session will build on the ongoing global rangeland dialogue by stakeholders (UNCCD member countries, NGOs/IGOs, and rangeland local users). It will also discuss the role of partnerships – governments, local communities, the private-sector – in rangeland restoration and the impacts in Africa. The session will showcase on-the-ground impacts from countries and outline the role of women and youth.

The session is co-organized by IUCN, WWF, UNEP, FAO, ILRI, ICRAF, WOCAT

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Technology and innovation for restoration monitoring is rapidly advancing supported by developments in geospatial technology and imagery. If deployed effectively across critical landscapes, these technical solutions for restoration planning and monitoring can drive restoration actions on the ground and contribute significantly to meeting the ambitious targets of the restoration, biodiversity and climate agendas. This session will spotlight key solutions and highlight ongoing challenges in ecosystem restoration monitoring with a focus on drylands. The session will feature a soft launch of the Framework For Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring (FERM) with a special focus on the integration and implementation of the Drylands Restoration Monitoring Platform (DRIP) developed by FAO in support of the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration.

Read moreWhite Paper 

 

  • Mette Løyche Wilkie

    Director, Forestry Division, FAO

  • Julian Fox

    Team Leader, National Forest Monitoring , FAO

  • Fidaa Haddad

    Forestry Officer / Dryland Program, FAO

  • Barnabas Marwire

    Natural Resource Management Specialist, FAO – Sub Regional Office for Southern Africa

  • Yelena Finegold

    Forestry Officer, FAO

  • Karis Tenneson

    Director of the Environmental Mapping Domain, Spatial Informatics Group

  • Jeff Vincent

    Professor in Forest Economics and Management, Duke University

  • Barron Joseph Orr

    Lead Scientist , United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)

  • Dominique Louppe

    Vice-chairperson, CIRAD, Committee on Forestry Working Group on Dryland Forests and Agrosilvopastoral Systems

Regreening Africa with Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)

This session will focus on innovative ways to capture restoration evidence and ensure it is integrated in the planning process, to inform practice and, in turn, inform policy – that is, the creation of the enabling environment.

Read moreWhite Paper 

  • Mieke Bourne

    Programme Manager, Regreening Africa-CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Leigh Winowiecki

    Soil Systems Scientist, Leader, Land Health Decisions, World Agroforestry (ICRAF)

  • Tor-Gunnar Vågen

    Senior Scientist and head of the Spatial Data Science and Applied Learning Lab (SPACIAL), CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Sammy Carsan

    Agroforestry Scientist, CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Judith Oduol

    Senior Agricultural Economist, CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Constance Neely

    Stakeholder Approach to Risk-informed and Evidence-based Decision-making (SHARED) Lead, CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Alex Mugayi

    Project Manager, World Vision Rwanda

  • Bernard Crabbé

    Head of the environment mainstreaming & circular economy sector, Directorate General, European Commission, International Partnerships (INTPA)

  • Mamadou Coulibaly

    Regreening Africa Project Manager, Oxfam Mali

17:25-18:15
World Resources Institute (WRI)

Restoring Africa’s drylands is a major economic opportunity: Every $1 invested can lead to $7-30 in economic benefits. Recognizing that opportunity, investors have committed more than $15 billion to AFR100 and the Great Green Wall through 2030. Now, billions of those dollars need to be directly invested in entrepreneurs and community organizations with the necessary long-term vision, local knowledge, and technical expertise to transform Africa’s drylands.

Join World Resources Institute (WRI) for a conversation with three private investors and the leaders of restoration projects that they have funded. Together, we will unpack how #GenerationRestoration can turn inspiring ideas into action on the ground.

18:15-19:15
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

A supportive policy environment must be built across the African continent to accelerate the collective movement for dryland restoration.

This plenary will call for a policy agenda to shape and meet the ambition of the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration from the start. By offering a deep dive into governance and exploring the role of local and national governments as well as citizens and the private sector, this session will provide a vision for policy coherence across sectors and scales. Join this call to action for a shift from designing policies to concretely implementing policies that make restoration work for all.

19:30-20:30
Coalition of European Lobbies for Eastern African Pastoralism (CELEP)

The Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival seeks to deepen understanding of how diverse peoples gain their livelihoods from extensive livestock production.
The relationships of pastoralist people and animals and their food production systems reflect an intimate intertwining of culture, economy and ecology in harsh environments such as Africa’s drylands. In such environments, mobility of animals plays a key role.
Films of multiple genres – spanning documentary, narrative and experimental – made by pastoralists and/or about pastoralists offer different insights into issues important to pastoralists.
The final session focuses on global recognition of pastoralism and its future with films from Uganda, India and Ireland. A short, animated film introducing pastoralism (CELEP, 2021), is followed by The Turkana (2019) shared by the Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa (AFSA). This video is about Turkana pastoralists of northern Uganda facing climate change.
Stories from the landscape: cattle drove (Paul Murphy, 2018) shows the living cultural heritage of transhumance in Europe: moving livestock to different grazing grounds in a seasonal cycle that goes back as long as people have been farming in the region. In Clare County of Ireland, the filmmaker follows the Burren Beo group through their Winterage Festival celebrating this ancient tradition that allows the region’s unique plant and animal life to flourish. Here, the highlands are grazed in the winter and the lowlands in summer. This is contrasted with the movement of sheep in the Alps of northern Italy, where flocks are moved to the mountain pastures for the summer.
Offering a South Asian perspective on pastoralism, Preserving Rajasthan’s camel herds (Cornelia Borrmann (reporter), Deutsche Welle, 2018) shows how the Raika people in India have been herding camels in Rajasthan for centuries. However, their traditional way of life is now under threat. A German NGO, the League for Pastoral Peoples, is trying to create better prospects for the camel herders through the sale of camel milk and other products, in order to help the Raika sustain their livelihoods.
The final film, Bayandalai: Lord of the Taiga (Aner Etxebarria Moral and Pablo Vidal Santos, 2018), leaves us with a question about the future. From inside his yurt in northern Mongolia, the reindeer herder Bayandalai ‒ an elder of the Dukhas tribe ‒ muses about the significance of life and death in the largest forest on Earth, the Taiga. Through his connection with the reindeer and with the Taiga, Bayandalai has access to spiritual and practical knowledge that he may not be able to pass on to his family members before the lures of city life — jobs, money, houses, things — entice them away.
Dr. Ann Waters-Bayer of the Agrecol Association, Dr. Margareta Lelea of the German Institute for Tropical and Subtropical Agriculture, and Loupa Pius from DADO – the Dynamic Agro-pastoralist Development Organization (DADO) Kaabong– will offer closing remarks and answer final questions.
A second edition of the Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival will be launched in 2022. And you can be part of it! New films may now be submitted using the link below:
https://filmfreeway.com/PerspectivesonPastoralismFilmFestival
http://www.pastoralistfilmfestival.com/
http://www.celep.info/

  • Ann Waters-Bayer

    Rural sociologist, Co-founder, Prolinnova

  • Margareta Lelea

    Geographer, German Institute for Tropical and Subtropical Agriculture (DITSL)

  • Loupa Pius

    Dynamic Agro-pastoralist Development Organization (DADO) Kaabong, Uganda and CELEP Member

Networking
Facilitated networking LIVE NOW
Global Landscapes Forum

Join us for an informal facilitated networking session. Guided by conversational menus, you will have the opportunity to connect with fellow conference participants in short breakout sessions. These sessions (in English and in French) are limited to 300 participants, on a first come, first served basis. Be sure to join the subsession in your preferred language.

Les sessions de réseautage vous mettront en relation avec des personnes du monde entier. Rencontrez une nouvelle personne toutes les cinq minutes ! Le modérateur vous fournira les informations que vous pourrez utiliser pour préparer vos questions afin de tirer le meilleur parti de votre temps de réseautage. Ces sessions (en anglais et en français) sont limitées à 300 participants, selon le principe du premier arrivé, premier servi. Vous auriez la possiblite de rejoindre la session dans langue de votre préférance.

Nairobi: UTC+03:00

Agenda

08:00-08:30
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) with Dynamic Youth for Land (Yilaa)

Women in Africa’s drylands could be likened to superheroes: they take care of the kids and the land, and ensure income for their families. And, as if this was not enough, they are an incredible source of knowledge on traditional practices, sustainable land management and innovations for resilience and survival during periods of drought. During this Youth Daily Show, we will present an intergenerational conversation between two women, exploring their roles in their communities, and understanding the importance of handing down knowledge from generation to generation.

Read more: Youth Participation at GLF Africa Digital Conference: A Wave of Opportunities

08:45-10:15
New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) with Justdiggit

Join us for an exclusive screening of a brand-new documentary featuring some of Africa’s restoration champions, AFR100 Presents: The Grand African Green Up. From Ghana to Kenya, Tanzania, and Madagascar, follow narrator Wanjira Mathai for a narrative journey through a few of Africa’s regenerating landscapes. The Grand African Green Up is co-produced by AUDA-NEPAD and Justdiggit, with support from World Resources Institute.

  • Wanjira Mathai

    Vice President and Regional Director for Africa, World Resources Institute (WRI)

09:30-10:00
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

As we enter a decade dedicated to ecosystem restoration, it is crucial to center the knowledge, interests and needs of the people that are stewarding the world’s remaining biodiversity: Indigenous peoples and local communities. During this special Youth Daily Show, Adjany Costa, a young marine biologist and ethno-conservationist from Angola, who also served as the youngest Minister of Culture, Tourism and Environment in Angola’s history, will share her own experience with community-led conservation as well as her perspective on setting robust foundations for a restoration movement that includes traditional ecological knowledge and scientific knowledge.

  • Hon. Adjany Costa

    Advisor for Environmental Affairs, President of the Republic of Angola

10:30-11:15
Global Landscapes Forum

Land is soil, land is food, land is life. Women’s, youths’ and pastoralists’ livelihoods and income often depend on it, but limited availability of communal land and challenges to formal ownership are increasingly creating tension between herders, farmers and investors. While formal land security in Africa is increasing, the number of land disputes is also on the rise, with women and youth often on the losing end. This plenary represents an intergenerational conversation among farmers, pastoralists, youth and elders, who will share their challenges and collectively explore solutions

  • Elizabeth Mpofu

    Founding member, General Coordinator, African Women Collaborative for Healthy Food Systems, Via Campesina

  • Diana Kyalo

    Founder and writer, Landpages

  • Amina Aden Maalim

    Research scientist, Kenya Forestry Research Institute (KEFRI)

  • Check Abdel Kader Baba

    Research associate country program manager, TMG Research

11:15-12:00
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) with German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU)

Degraded landscapes threaten the livelihood of the majority of rural populations. In years of implementing landscape restoration activities, it has become clear that embedding the interventions in the local communities is essential to the sustainability and success of such initiatives. A comprehensive participation of local stakeholders in the planning and implementation processes have a great potential to empower local structures and communities, especially women and youth, and become an irreplaceable core of ecosystem restoration.

GIZ and partners from its Forests4Future and Large-scale Forest Landscape Restoration (FLR) in Africa programme will showcase how initiatives such as the AFR100 and international FLR programs for restoring degraded landscapes must use this potential!

Read moreWhite Paper 

  • Tony Rinaudo

    Principal Natural Resources Advisor, World Vision Australia

  • Mamadou Moussa Diakhité

    Team leader of AUDA-NEPAD and Executive Secretary of the AFR100 Secretariat

  • Tabi Joda

    Executive Director, GreenAid

  • Charles Karangwa

    Regional Lead- Forests, Landscapes and Livelihoods Programme; Country Representative for Rwanda, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

  • Joséphine Makueti

    Senior Expert for Landscape Restoration, Associated Researcher, Forest and Environment Programme at German Cooperation (GIZ), CIRAD

12:15-13:45
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) with Global Landscapes Forum, International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO)

Get an inside look at the results of the African capacity needs assessment undertaken by the UN FAO-led taskforce on best practices. This session will raise awareness of the existing systemic capacities for restoration as well as the current gaps and barriers, and of the opportunities to meet these needs in the context of the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration.

The session will highlight pathways towards enhancing practitioners’ capacities through the development or up-scaling of key knowledge products and various capacity development initiatives, such as the Landscape Academy, the FAO-ELTI youth contest, and the Restoration Factory.

  • Tiina Vähänen

    Deputy Director, Forestry Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Christophe Besacier

    Senior Forestry Officer, Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism Forestry Division, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Faustine Zoveda

    Forestry Officer, Forest and Landscape Restoration Mechanism Forestry Division , Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Robin Chazdon

    Research and Consultant, Forestoration International

  • Adejoke Olukemi Akinyele

    Reader, Department of Forest Production and Products, University of Ibadan

  • Esther Ekua Amoako

    Lecturer, Faculty of Natural Resource and Environment, University for Development Studies, Tamale Ghana/PhD student at Rhodes University, South Africa

  • Patrick P. Kalas

    Natural Resources Officer (Capacity, Institutional Development and Governance), Office for Climate, Biodiversity and Environment (OCB), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

  • Jesca Jepkosgei Kiplagat

    Community of Practice Coordinator, Africa Chapter Manager, GLFx

  • Moussa Maïhatchi Chipkao

    Alumni of the Restoration Factory, PDG Centre Africain d’Agrobusiness (CAAB)

  • Estelle Manuela Nganlo Keguep

    Forest environmentalist, ELTI alumni

  • Cora van Oosten

    Senior Project Leader, Wageningen Centre for Development Innovation, Wageningen University

  • Steve Makungwa

    Senior lecturer, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources

12:15-13:00
Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) on behalf of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) with World Vision

The world has experienced severe land degradation due to deforestation, climate change, drought, desertification and unsustainable land uses. Consequently, the productivity and health of farmlands, grazing lands and forests is damaged, which in turn harms the individuals and communities who depend on these resources for their food supply, health and income. As a result, many rural populations in the developing world suffer from malnutrition, loss of opportunity, increased vulnerability and poverty. Migration increases as workers move away to earn a living, which can also lead to family fragmentation and increased potential for conflict. This is not a safe or sustainable future for rural communities. Nor does it help the growth of nations reliant on primary industries, such as agriculture.

But this is changing. Communities across the world are transforming their lives and reshaping their lands through a low-cost, simple and sustainable land regeneration practice called Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR). Through FMNR and their own efforts, communities can restore degraded lands to productivity relatively quickly and efficiently. FMNR has proven its potential in mobilizing and empowering local communities to restore their natural environment and consequently building resilience – of people, their lands and their livelihoods.
Join Tony Rinaudo (World Vision Senior Climate Action Advisor, pioneer of FMNR and Right Livelihood Award Laureate, 2018) and Irene Ojuok (Right Livelihood College PhD student at the Center for Development Research (ZEF) and Global Evergreening Ambassador) as they speak on the FMNR approach from a global and Kenyan perspective.

Read moreWhite Paper 

  • Tony Rinaudo

    Principal Natural Resources Advisor, World Vision Australia

  • Irene Ojuok

    Environmentalist, Junior Researcher, Center for Research and Development ZEF - University of Bonn

13:00-13:45
Coalition of European Lobbies for Eastern African Pastoralism (CELEP)

The Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival seeks to deepen understanding of how diverse peoples gain their livelihoods from extensive livestock production.

The relationships of pastoralist people and animals and their food production systems reflect an intimate intertwining of culture, economy and ecology in harsh environments such as Africa’s drylands. In such environments, mobility of animals plays a key role.

Films of multiple genres – spanning documentary, narrative and experimental – made by pastoralists and/or about pastoralists offer different insights into issues important to pastoralists.

This third session confronts political and economic injustices with the theme, ‘Speaking truth to power: pastoralists’ advocacy’. Nick Lunch, from Insight Share in the UK will share a few words about participatory video and the making of Olosho. After a short animation film introducing pastoralism (CELEP, 2021), there is a short film featuring Shoba Liban, Program Manager of the Pastoralist Women Health and Education non-profit organization based in Isiolo, Kenya (CELEP, 2019).

Land grabbing in pastoralist areas is unmasked through two films in this session. Olosho (2015) is a participatory video (PV) made by 6 community members in Loliondo from 5 Maasai clans in northern Tanzania, created with facilitation from InsightShare. In 1992, a hunting company from the United Arab Emirates occupied 1500 km2 of village land in Loliondo to set up a private game reserve beside the Serengeti National Park. Since then, Maasai have been denied access to vital pasture and waterpoints for their herds. The people suffered mass eviction from their villages within the disputed land. The PV training strengthened the Maasai’s self-advocacy to resist land-grabbing by foreign investors.

The last film in this session is an advocacy film, Lower Omo: local tribes under threat (2012). The filmmaker chooses to remain anonymous out of safety concerns. The think-tank, Oakland Institute, shares this film to reveal the situation of agropastoralists in the Lower Omo Valley in Southern Ethiopia, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is home to about 200,000 people from several ethnic groups, e.g. the Bode, Dassenach, Hamer, Karo, Kwegu, Mursi, Nyangatom and Suri. Most of them raise livestock where the annual flooding of the Omo River replenishes grazing areas and practise flood-retreat cropping on the riverbanks. Their cattle are a source of food, wealth and pride, and are intimately tied to their cultural identity. The lives and culture of these peoples are threatened by the construction of the Gibe III dam.

The themes presented will be elaborated further by Dr. Christina (Echi) Gabbert from the Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology at Göttingen University, Germany, who can also answer questions from the audience. She has collaborated in southern Ethiopia with pastoralists over the last twenty years. Among her many publications, she is one of the editors of the book, Lands of the Future: Anthropological Perspectives on Pastoralism, Land Deals and Tropes of Modernity.

A second edition of the Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival will be launched in 2022. And you can be part of it! New films may now be submitted using the link below:
https://filmfreeway.com/PerspectivesonPastoralismFilmFestival
http://www.pastoralistfilmfestival.com/
http://www.celep.info/

13:00-13:30
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) with The International Forestry Students’ Association (IFSA), Young Professionals for Agricultural Development (YPARD)

On the one hand, we have drylands. They constitute 60% of the surface of the African continent, and while some might think they do not have much agricultural potential, they can actually sustain thriving agricultural practices, including – but not limited to – agroforestry systems.

On the other hand, we have youth. Young people are dynamic and innovative; have a high uptake of technological know-how; and are passionate, perseverant, and most of all, courageous.

During this Youth Daily Show, we want to explore the opportunities that agroforestry can bring to Africa’s drylands – not only as a sustainable food system, but also as an opportunity for youth employment and the achievement of food security for present and future generations. We will hear from amazing young professionals from across the African continent, who will share their experience with, and innovations for, dryland agroforestry.

Read more: Youth Participation at GLF Africa Digital Conference: A Wave of Opportunities

14:00-15:30
World Resources Institute (WRI)

It’s hard to see where people are restoring Africa’s drylands. Where trees are growing outside of tropical forests, it’s hard for satellites to pick them up and harder to measure their economic and social benefits. It’s even harder to show progress when restoration doesn’t involve trees. In this session, you will learn directly about these challenges and opportunities from people actively restoring drylands. Together, we will unpack the what, the why, and the how of monitoring restoration in drylands — and show how tracking progress can lead to more investment and healthier communities. Join World Resources Institute for this exciting and interactive conversation.

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU)

We are at a critical crossroads in human history. We can continue on the path that has led to degradation of ecosystems, climate change, poverty, and inequality or we can reverse those trends and create new, regenerative, inclusive, and efficient systems of living and doing business. We propose that the urgent need for housing be met by modern, engineered wood buildings and that the demand for wood be leveraged to drive restorative management of degraded dry tropical forests. Restorative forest management becomes possible through a new and integrated tropical timber industry based on local control and entrepreneurship.

Read moreWhite Paper 

World Bank

Tropical dry forests are subject to some of the highest rates of deforestation and degradation around the world, even though they cover some 2.7 million square kilometers in Africa alone and represent globally important carbon storage. These ecosystems are particularly at risk due their fragility and the high demand for forest goods and services, which are required to support the livelihoods of large numbers of the world’s poorest people. Despite their importance, little is known about dry forests and they are often not covered by inventories and management planning.

Recent major breakthroughs in satellite Earth Observation (EO) data provision provide unprecedented views of the Earth and present an opportunity to address existing limitations in forest monitoring capabilities. In 2014 and 2015, the European Space Agency (ESA) launched two satellite missions – Sentinel-1 and Sentinel-2 – to improve monitoring the global environment. Both satellites are revolutionary in terms of wide coverage, high spatial resolution, and frequent repeat coverage. Similar to the Landsat-8 mission, data collected by the Sentinel satellites are provided through an open access policy. These missions and open access policies have dramatically increased available data on global forests.

The session will focus on introducing the new and innovative tools developed by the Satellite Monitoring for Forest Management (SMFM) project by the World Bank in 2017–2020. The SMFM project developed tools to allow forest practitioners to use these new satellite resources for forest cover and biomass assessment, dense time-series change analysis and analyzing the drivers of forest change.

Read moreWhite Paper

  • Idah Z. Pswarayi-Riddihough

    Country Director, Mozambique, Madagascar, Mauritius, Comoros and Seychelles, Eastern and Southern Africa, Africa, The World Bank

  • Tuukka Castrén

    Senior Forestry Specialist, The World Bank

  • Phoebe Oduor

    GHG/SLEEK Project Manager, Regional Centre for Mapping of Resources for Development

  • Sam Bowers

    Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Edinburgh

  • Aristides Muhate

    MRV Coordinator, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development, Mozambique

15:45-17:15
International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)

Rangelands occupy one-third of all land on earth, are home to important biodiversity, support more than 2 billion people and significantly contribute to the SDGs. Despite their importance, rangelands continue to be characterized by chronic underinvestment and high degradation. This session will build on the ongoing global rangeland dialogue by stakeholders (UNCCD member countries, NGOs/IGOs, and rangeland local users). It will also discuss the role of partnerships – governments, local communities, the private-sector – in rangeland restoration and the impacts in Africa. The session will showcase on-the-ground impacts from countries and outline the role of women and youth.

The session is co-organized by IUCN, WWF, UNEP, FAO, ILRI, ICRAF, WOCAT

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)

Technology and innovation for restoration monitoring is rapidly advancing supported by developments in geospatial technology and imagery. If deployed effectively across critical landscapes, these technical solutions for restoration planning and monitoring can drive restoration actions on the ground and contribute significantly to meeting the ambitious targets of the restoration, biodiversity and climate agendas. This session will spotlight key solutions and highlight ongoing challenges in ecosystem restoration monitoring with a focus on drylands. The session will feature a soft launch of the Framework For Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring (FERM) with a special focus on the integration and implementation of the Drylands Restoration Monitoring Platform (DRIP) developed by FAO in support of the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration.

Read moreWhite Paper 

 

  • Mette Løyche Wilkie

    Director, Forestry Division, FAO

  • Julian Fox

    Team Leader, National Forest Monitoring , FAO

  • Fidaa Haddad

    Forestry Officer / Dryland Program, FAO

  • Barnabas Marwire

    Natural Resource Management Specialist, FAO – Sub Regional Office for Southern Africa

  • Yelena Finegold

    Forestry Officer, FAO

  • Karis Tenneson

    Director of the Environmental Mapping Domain, Spatial Informatics Group

  • Jeff Vincent

    Professor in Forest Economics and Management, Duke University

  • Barron Joseph Orr

    Lead Scientist , United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)

  • Dominique Louppe

    Vice-chairperson, CIRAD, Committee on Forestry Working Group on Dryland Forests and Agrosilvopastoral Systems

Regreening Africa with Center for International Forestry Research (CIFOR)

This session will focus on innovative ways to capture restoration evidence and ensure it is integrated in the planning process, to inform practice and, in turn, inform policy – that is, the creation of the enabling environment.

Read moreWhite Paper 

  • Mieke Bourne

    Programme Manager, Regreening Africa-CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Leigh Winowiecki

    Soil Systems Scientist, Leader, Land Health Decisions, World Agroforestry (ICRAF)

  • Tor-Gunnar Vågen

    Senior Scientist and head of the Spatial Data Science and Applied Learning Lab (SPACIAL), CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Sammy Carsan

    Agroforestry Scientist, CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Judith Oduol

    Senior Agricultural Economist, CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Constance Neely

    Stakeholder Approach to Risk-informed and Evidence-based Decision-making (SHARED) Lead, CIFOR-ICRAF

  • Alex Mugayi

    Project Manager, World Vision Rwanda

  • Bernard Crabbé

    Head of the environment mainstreaming & circular economy sector, Directorate General, European Commission, International Partnerships (INTPA)

  • Mamadou Coulibaly

    Regreening Africa Project Manager, Oxfam Mali

17:25-18:15
World Resources Institute (WRI)

Restoring Africa’s drylands is a major economic opportunity: Every $1 invested can lead to $7-30 in economic benefits. Recognizing that opportunity, investors have committed more than $15 billion to AFR100 and the Great Green Wall through 2030. Now, billions of those dollars need to be directly invested in entrepreneurs and community organizations with the necessary long-term vision, local knowledge, and technical expertise to transform Africa’s drylands.

Join World Resources Institute (WRI) for a conversation with three private investors and the leaders of restoration projects that they have funded. Together, we will unpack how #GenerationRestoration can turn inspiring ideas into action on the ground.

18:15-19:15
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

A supportive policy environment must be built across the African continent to accelerate the collective movement for dryland restoration.

This plenary will call for a policy agenda to shape and meet the ambition of the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration from the start. By offering a deep dive into governance and exploring the role of local and national governments as well as citizens and the private sector, this session will provide a vision for policy coherence across sectors and scales. Join this call to action for a shift from designing policies to concretely implementing policies that make restoration work for all.

19:30-20:30
Coalition of European Lobbies for Eastern African Pastoralism (CELEP)

The Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival seeks to deepen understanding of how diverse peoples gain their livelihoods from extensive livestock production.
The relationships of pastoralist people and animals and their food production systems reflect an intimate intertwining of culture, economy and ecology in harsh environments such as Africa’s drylands. In such environments, mobility of animals plays a key role.
Films of multiple genres – spanning documentary, narrative and experimental – made by pastoralists and/or about pastoralists offer different insights into issues important to pastoralists.
The final session focuses on global recognition of pastoralism and its future with films from Uganda, India and Ireland. A short, animated film introducing pastoralism (CELEP, 2021), is followed by The Turkana (2019) shared by the Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa (AFSA). This video is about Turkana pastoralists of northern Uganda facing climate change.
Stories from the landscape: cattle drove (Paul Murphy, 2018) shows the living cultural heritage of transhumance in Europe: moving livestock to different grazing grounds in a seasonal cycle that goes back as long as people have been farming in the region. In Clare County of Ireland, the filmmaker follows the Burren Beo group through their Winterage Festival celebrating this ancient tradition that allows the region’s unique plant and animal life to flourish. Here, the highlands are grazed in the winter and the lowlands in summer. This is contrasted with the movement of sheep in the Alps of northern Italy, where flocks are moved to the mountain pastures for the summer.
Offering a South Asian perspective on pastoralism, Preserving Rajasthan’s camel herds (Cornelia Borrmann (reporter), Deutsche Welle, 2018) shows how the Raika people in India have been herding camels in Rajasthan for centuries. However, their traditional way of life is now under threat. A German NGO, the League for Pastoral Peoples, is trying to create better prospects for the camel herders through the sale of camel milk and other products, in order to help the Raika sustain their livelihoods.
The final film, Bayandalai: Lord of the Taiga (Aner Etxebarria Moral and Pablo Vidal Santos, 2018), leaves us with a question about the future. From inside his yurt in northern Mongolia, the reindeer herder Bayandalai ‒ an elder of the Dukhas tribe ‒ muses about the significance of life and death in the largest forest on Earth, the Taiga. Through his connection with the reindeer and with the Taiga, Bayandalai has access to spiritual and practical knowledge that he may not be able to pass on to his family members before the lures of city life — jobs, money, houses, things — entice them away.
Dr. Ann Waters-Bayer of the Agrecol Association, Dr. Margareta Lelea of the German Institute for Tropical and Subtropical Agriculture, and Loupa Pius from DADO – the Dynamic Agro-pastoralist Development Organization (DADO) Kaabong– will offer closing remarks and answer final questions.
A second edition of the Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival will be launched in 2022. And you can be part of it! New films may now be submitted using the link below:
https://filmfreeway.com/PerspectivesonPastoralismFilmFestival
http://www.pastoralistfilmfestival.com/
http://www.celep.info/

  • Ann Waters-Bayer

    Rural sociologist, Co-founder, Prolinnova

  • Margareta Lelea

    Geographer, German Institute for Tropical and Subtropical Agriculture (DITSL)

  • Loupa Pius

    Dynamic Agro-pastoralist Development Organization (DADO) Kaabong, Uganda and CELEP Member

Networking
Facilitated networking LIVE NOW
Global Landscapes Forum

Join us for an informal facilitated networking session. Guided by conversational menus, you will have the opportunity to connect with fellow conference participants in short breakout sessions. These sessions (in English and in French) are limited to 300 participants, on a first come, first served basis. Be sure to join the subsession in your preferred language.

Les sessions de réseautage vous mettront en relation avec des personnes du monde entier. Rencontrez une nouvelle personne toutes les cinq minutes ! Le modérateur vous fournira les informations que vous pourrez utiliser pour préparer vos questions afin de tirer le meilleur parti de votre temps de réseautage. Ces sessions (en anglais et en français) sont limitées à 300 participants, selon le principe du premier arrivé, premier servi. Vous auriez la possiblite de rejoindre la session dans langue de votre préférance.

Wednesday, 02 June 2021

Nairobi: UTC+03:00

Agenda

08:30-09:15
Coalition of European Lobbies for Eastern African Pastoralism (CELEP)

The Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival seeks to deepen understanding of how diverse peoples sustain their livelihoods from extensive livestock production.
The relationships between pastoralist people, animals and their food production systems reflect an intimate intertwining of culture, economy and ecology in harsh environments, such as Africa’s drylands, where the mobility of animals plays a key role.
Films of multiple genres – spanning documentary, narrative and experimental – made by pastoralists and/or about pastoralists offer different insights into issues important to pastoralists.
This first session starts with an introductory animation film (CELEP 2021). Then, we will feature the film UnderMining Uganda (Karamoja Development Forum 2017), which shows the negative impacts upon pastoralists in the Karamoja region 20 years since the start of industrial mining. This film explores the reasons why the industry is far from contributing to socioeconomic gains in this largely pastoral region. Worse, it is contributing to massive land grabs that are undermining the livelihoods of pastoralists and other inhabitants of the area. To contextualize the film, Loupa Pius from DADO – the Dynamic Agro-pastoralist Development Organization (DADO) Kaabong – will share his experiences and insights and will answer audience questions. He is also co-chair of the regional group in Eastern & Southern Africa supporting the International Year of Rangelands & Pastoralists (www.iyrp.info) that has been put forward in the United Nations.
A second edition of the Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival will be launched in 2022. And you can be part of it! New films may now be submitted using the link(s) below:

https://filmfreeway.com/PerspectivesonPastoralismFilmFestival
http://www.pastoralistfilmfestival.com/
http://www.celep.info/

  • Loupa Pius

    Dynamic Agro-pastoralist Development Organization (DADO) Kaabong, Uganda and CELEP Member

13:00-13:45
The International Livestock Research Institute

Take a virtual trip to the great savanna lands of East Africa—cradle of humankind, home to traditional nomadic pastoralists, and last refuge of some of the most spectacular wildlife populations on earth.

Join experts from the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) including rangelands specialist Fiona Flintan, ecosystem ecologist Jason Sircely and gender scientist Renee Bullock to hear some ‘myth-busting’ facts about East Africa’s extraordinary drylands and dryland peoples, to discover why Africa’s rangelands are now in big transition, and to learn how we can best support local pastoral communities to continue their stewardship of these exceptional landscapes as they continually refine their adaptations to a changing physical, political and socio-economic climate.

Hear directly from East African pastoralists as they explain some of the major challenges they face. As agricultural ecologist Ian Scoones reminds us: ‘As we confront uncertainties in today’s complex and turbulent world, we could all learn from pastoralists, who continue to navigate uncertainties with deep knowledge and practised skill.’

  • Fiona Flintan

    Governance Scientist and Technical Coordinator, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

  • Jason Sircely

    Ecosystem Ecologist, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

  • Mary Letirok

    Samburu herder

  • Renee Bullock

    Gender and environment scientist, International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)

  • Dickson Ole Kaelo

    Wildlife Management Expert and the founding Chief Executive Officer, Kenya Wildlife Conservancies Association (KWCA)

20:15-21:00
Coalition of European Lobbies for Eastern African Pastoralism (CELEP)

The Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival seeks to deepen understanding of how diverse peoples sustain their livelihoods from extensive livestock production.

The relationships between pastoralist people, animals and their food production systems reflect an intimate intertwining of culture, economy and ecology in harsh environments, such as Africa’s drylands, where the mobility of animals plays a key role.

Films of multiple genres – spanning documentary, narrative and experimental – made by pastoralists and/or about pastoralists offer different insights into issues important to pastoralists.

This second session begins with an introductory animation film (CELEP 2021) and then focuses on pastoralist livelihoods in Africa through two films made in Niger. The first is a documentary, Waynaabe: Life scenes of the Wodaabe breeders (Francesco Sincich 2012), which shows the life of nomadic Wodaabe livestock keepers through the eyes of the young mother Mooro. Her unmarried niece, Mariama, explains the worso, a ceremonial gathering of their clan in Akadaney. The film highlights how the Wodaabe value their cattle and deal with the challenges of securing a livelihood in the drylands of Niger. It was commissioned by Vétérinaires Sans Frontières (VSF) Belgium to show the setting of their work on animal health.

The next film is a short, Ngaynaaka: Herding chaos (Saverio Krätli 2017), which focuses on how pastoralists thrive on nature’s variability. As the environment becomes more unpredictable, people all over the world face higher costs in an effort to sustain the usual strategies aimed at controlling it. The Wodaabe pastoralists show that there is another way.

Dr. Saverio Krätli, an honorary editor of the journal Nomadic Peoples, is an anthropologist specializing in pastoral systems. Saverio has worked extensively across sub-Saharan Africa. Among his many publications, he wrote the Pastoral Development Orientation Framework in 2019. Saverio will share insights from his experience working on Ngaynaaka: Herding chaos, and will offer an audience Q&A.
A second edition of the Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival will be launched in 2022. And you can be part of it! New films may now be submitted using the link(s) below:
https://filmfreeway.com/PerspectivesonPastoralismFilmFestival
http://www.pastoralistfilmfestival.com/
http://www.celep.info/

Thursday, 03 June 2021

Nairobi: UTC+03:00

Agenda

13:00-13:45
Coalition of European Lobbies for Eastern African Pastoralism (CELEP)

The Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival seeks to deepen understanding of how diverse peoples gain their livelihoods from extensive livestock production.

The relationships of pastoralist people and animals and their food production systems reflect an intimate intertwining of culture, economy and ecology in harsh environments such as Africa’s drylands. In such environments, mobility of animals plays a key role.

Films of multiple genres – spanning documentary, narrative and experimental – made by pastoralists and/or about pastoralists offer different insights into issues important to pastoralists.

This third session confronts political and economic injustices with the theme, ‘Speaking truth to power: pastoralists’ advocacy’. Nick Lunch, from Insight Share in the UK will share a few words about participatory video and the making of Olosho. After a short animation film introducing pastoralism (CELEP, 2021), there is a short film featuring Shoba Liban, Program Manager of the Pastoralist Women Health and Education non-profit organization based in Isiolo, Kenya (CELEP, 2019).

Land grabbing in pastoralist areas is unmasked through two films in this session. Olosho (2015) is a participatory video (PV) made by 6 community members in Loliondo from 5 Maasai clans in northern Tanzania, created with facilitation from InsightShare. In 1992, a hunting company from the United Arab Emirates occupied 1500 km2 of village land in Loliondo to set up a private game reserve beside the Serengeti National Park. Since then, Maasai have been denied access to vital pasture and waterpoints for their herds. The people suffered mass eviction from their villages within the disputed land. The PV training strengthened the Maasai’s self-advocacy to resist land-grabbing by foreign investors.

The last film in this session is an advocacy film, Lower Omo: local tribes under threat (2012). The filmmaker chooses to remain anonymous out of safety concerns. The think-tank, Oakland Institute, shares this film to reveal the situation of agropastoralists in the Lower Omo Valley in Southern Ethiopia, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is home to about 200,000 people from several ethnic groups, e.g. the Bode, Dassenach, Hamer, Karo, Kwegu, Mursi, Nyangatom and Suri. Most of them raise livestock where the annual flooding of the Omo River replenishes grazing areas and practise flood-retreat cropping on the riverbanks. Their cattle are a source of food, wealth and pride, and are intimately tied to their cultural identity. The lives and culture of these peoples are threatened by the construction of the Gibe III dam.

The themes presented will be elaborated further by Dr. Christina (Echi) Gabbert from the Institute for Social and Cultural Anthropology at Göttingen University, Germany, who can also answer questions from the audience. She has collaborated in southern Ethiopia with pastoralists over the last twenty years. Among her many publications, she is one of the editors of the book, Lands of the Future: Anthropological Perspectives on Pastoralism, Land Deals and Tropes of Modernity.

A second edition of the Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival will be launched in 2022. And you can be part of it! New films may now be submitted using the link below:
https://filmfreeway.com/PerspectivesonPastoralismFilmFestival
http://www.pastoralistfilmfestival.com/
http://www.celep.info/

19:30-20:30
Coalition of European Lobbies for Eastern African Pastoralism (CELEP)

The Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival seeks to deepen understanding of how diverse peoples gain their livelihoods from extensive livestock production.
The relationships of pastoralist people and animals and their food production systems reflect an intimate intertwining of culture, economy and ecology in harsh environments such as Africa’s drylands. In such environments, mobility of animals plays a key role.
Films of multiple genres – spanning documentary, narrative and experimental – made by pastoralists and/or about pastoralists offer different insights into issues important to pastoralists.
The final session focuses on global recognition of pastoralism and its future with films from Uganda, India and Ireland. A short, animated film introducing pastoralism (CELEP, 2021), is followed by The Turkana (2019) shared by the Alliance for Food Sovereignty in Africa (AFSA). This video is about Turkana pastoralists of northern Uganda facing climate change.
Stories from the landscape: cattle drove (Paul Murphy, 2018) shows the living cultural heritage of transhumance in Europe: moving livestock to different grazing grounds in a seasonal cycle that goes back as long as people have been farming in the region. In Clare County of Ireland, the filmmaker follows the Burren Beo group through their Winterage Festival celebrating this ancient tradition that allows the region’s unique plant and animal life to flourish. Here, the highlands are grazed in the winter and the lowlands in summer. This is contrasted with the movement of sheep in the Alps of northern Italy, where flocks are moved to the mountain pastures for the summer.
Offering a South Asian perspective on pastoralism, Preserving Rajasthan’s camel herds (Cornelia Borrmann (reporter), Deutsche Welle, 2018) shows how the Raika people in India have been herding camels in Rajasthan for centuries. However, their traditional way of life is now under threat. A German NGO, the League for Pastoral Peoples, is trying to create better prospects for the camel herders through the sale of camel milk and other products, in order to help the Raika sustain their livelihoods.
The final film, Bayandalai: Lord of the Taiga (Aner Etxebarria Moral and Pablo Vidal Santos, 2018), leaves us with a question about the future. From inside his yurt in northern Mongolia, the reindeer herder Bayandalai ‒ an elder of the Dukhas tribe ‒ muses about the significance of life and death in the largest forest on Earth, the Taiga. Through his connection with the reindeer and with the Taiga, Bayandalai has access to spiritual and practical knowledge that he may not be able to pass on to his family members before the lures of city life — jobs, money, houses, things — entice them away.
Dr. Ann Waters-Bayer of the Agrecol Association, Dr. Margareta Lelea of the German Institute for Tropical and Subtropical Agriculture, and Loupa Pius from DADO – the Dynamic Agro-pastoralist Development Organization (DADO) Kaabong– will offer closing remarks and answer final questions.
A second edition of the Perspectives on Pastoralism Film Festival will be launched in 2022. And you can be part of it! New films may now be submitted using the link below:
https://filmfreeway.com/PerspectivesonPastoralismFilmFestival
http://www.pastoralistfilmfestival.com/
http://www.celep.info/

  • Ann Waters-Bayer

    Rural sociologist, Co-founder, Prolinnova

  • Margareta Lelea

    Geographer, German Institute for Tropical and Subtropical Agriculture (DITSL)

  • Loupa Pius

    Dynamic Agro-pastoralist Development Organization (DADO) Kaabong, Uganda and CELEP Member

Wednesday, 02 June 2021

Nairobi: UTC+03:00

Agenda

08:30-09:00
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) with Youth4Nature

Young people in Africa are increasingly interested in being a part of the restoration movement – either by leading restoration in their landscapes, or by joining an existing restoration project. But it’s not always easy to identify which activities to join, or how to start your own project. In this session, jointly organized by Youth 4 Nature (Y4N) and the Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL), we will explore how young people across Africa are getting involved in restoration; how they started their journeys; the challenges they have faced; and the solutions they have found. Two young African leaders at the forefront of landscape restoration will share with us their inspiring stories, and explain how drylands are landscapes of hope – for communities and for nature.

Read more: Youth Participation at GLF Africa Digital Conference: A Wave of Opportunities

  • Patience Onyeche Adaje

    PhD candidate in Environmental Economics and Management, University of Agriculture Makurdi Benue State, Nigeria

  • Olupot Joseph

    Assistant Director, Priceless Farms, YIL Alumni

13:00-13:30
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) with The African Youth Initiative on Climate Change (AYICC)

The Youth population in Africa is projected to reach 1.2 billion by 2030. But lack of job opportunities, under-employment or challenging work conditions might increasingly become problematic as the number of young people increases. This Youth Daily Show, jointly organized by the African Youth Initiative on Climate Change and the Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL), will explore the topic of youth unemployment in Africa and how dryland’s restoration, and more in general the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, can play a role in increasing employment opportunities for regional youth. Two young African leaders will share with us their perspectives and stories and together we will explore how the restoration of drylands can bring hope, for communities and for nature.

Read more: Youth Participation at GLF Africa Digital Conference: A Wave of Opportunities

  • Helina Teklu

    Co-founder , Climate Change Africa and Seed Bomb Ethiopia

  • Desmond Alugnoa

    Co-founder, Green Africa Youth Organization (GAYO)

Thursday, 03 June 2021

Nairobi: UTC+03:00

Agenda

08:00-08:30
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) with Dynamic Youth for Land (Yilaa)

Women in Africa’s drylands could be likened to superheroes: they take care of the kids and the land, and ensure income for their families. And, as if this was not enough, they are an incredible source of knowledge on traditional practices, sustainable land management and innovations for resilience and survival during periods of drought. During this Youth Daily Show, we will present an intergenerational conversation between two women, exploring their roles in their communities, and understanding the importance of handing down knowledge from generation to generation.

Read more: Youth Participation at GLF Africa Digital Conference: A Wave of Opportunities

09:30-10:00
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL)

As we enter a decade dedicated to ecosystem restoration, it is crucial to center the knowledge, interests and needs of the people that are stewarding the world’s remaining biodiversity: Indigenous peoples and local communities. During this special Youth Daily Show, Adjany Costa, a young marine biologist and ethno-conservationist from Angola, who also served as the youngest Minister of Culture, Tourism and Environment in Angola’s history, will share her own experience with community-led conservation as well as her perspective on setting robust foundations for a restoration movement that includes traditional ecological knowledge and scientific knowledge.

  • Hon. Adjany Costa

    Advisor for Environmental Affairs, President of the Republic of Angola

13:00-13:30
Youth in Landscapes Initiative (YIL) with The International Forestry Students’ Association (IFSA), Young Professionals for Agricultural Development (YPARD)

On the one hand, we have drylands. They constitute 60% of the surface of the African continent, and while some might think they do not have much agricultural potential, they can actually sustain thriving agricultural practices, including – but not limited to – agroforestry systems.

On the other hand, we have youth. Young people are dynamic and innovative; have a high uptake of technological know-how; and are passionate, perseverant, and most of all, courageous.

During this Youth Daily Show, we want to explore the opportunities that agroforestry can bring to Africa’s drylands – not only as a sustainable food system, but also as an opportunity for youth employment and the achievement of food security for present and future generations. We will hear from amazing young professionals from across the African continent, who will share their experience with, and innovations for, dryland agroforestry.

Read more: Youth Participation at GLF Africa Digital Conference: A Wave of Opportunities

Wednesday, 02 June 2021

Nairobi: UTC+03:00

Agenda

08:30-09:15
Networking
Facilitated networking LIVE NOW
Global Landscapes Forum

Join us for an informal facilitated networking session. Guided by conversational menus, you will have the opportunity to connect with fellow conference participants in short breakout sessions. These sessions (in English and in French) are limited to 300 participants, on a first come, first served basis. Be sure to join the subsession in your preferred language.

Les sessions de réseautage vous mettront en relation avec des personnes du monde entier. Rencontrez une nouvelle personne toutes les cinq minutes ! Le modérateur vous fournira les informations que vous pourrez utiliser pour préparer vos questions afin de tirer le meilleur parti de votre temps de réseautage. Ces sessions (en anglais et en français) sont limitées à 300 participants, selon le principe du premier arrivé, premier servi. Vous auriez la possiblite de rejoindre la session dans langue de votre préférance. 

Thursday, 03 June 2021

Nairobi: UTC+03:00

Agenda

19:30-20:30
Networking
Facilitated networking LIVE NOW
Global Landscapes Forum

Join us for an informal facilitated networking session. Guided by conversational menus, you will have the opportunity to connect with fellow conference participants in short breakout sessions. These sessions (in English and in French) are limited to 300 participants, on a first come, first served basis. Be sure to join the subsession in your preferred language.

Les sessions de réseautage vous mettront en relation avec des personnes du monde entier. Rencontrez une nouvelle personne toutes les cinq minutes ! Le modérateur vous fournira les informations que vous pourrez utiliser pour préparer vos questions afin de tirer le meilleur parti de votre temps de réseautage. Ces sessions (en anglais et en français) sont limitées à 300 participants, selon le principe du premier arrivé, premier servi. Vous auriez la possiblite de rejoindre la session dans langue de votre préférance.