Saal Schumann


Climate change is already threatening people’s guaranteed rights. It is affecting  rights to life, health, to food, water and housing. In the case of small island states, it touches on the very right to exist. Almost 70 years after the signature of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, human rights were recognised for the first time in history in an international  climate change treaty. The preamble to the Paris Agreement includes an acknowledgement “that climate change is a common concern of humankind” and that “Parties should, when taking action to address climate change, respect, promote and consider their respective obligations on human rights”. In consequence, for the 24th Conference of Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change, the independent experts of the UN Human Rights Council called upon the parties to take the necessary steps to operationalise their human rights obligations in the Paris Rulebook. But how accountable are states? How does climate change impact their security and the peacekeeping? And how are specifically youth and marginalised groups, such as indigenous people, affected?

The interactive session of Youth in Landscapes will discuss with experts these four critical issues in a small podium discussion. Later on, the experts will join the floor and will discuss in small expert groups the respective topics.